Data + Design Project

How Creatives Work: The Ever Playful Alexander Calder

Thursday 12.05.2013 , Posted by

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Alexander Calder made play the major theme of his art. Over the course of more than fifty years, he worked harder than most in the pursuit of the creation of his own universe, invented a whole new genre, an art of moving sculpture known as ‘mobiles,’ and made works on an unsurpassed scale. But he was also an incredibly interesting character, a man who had a childlike view of life which translated seamlessly into his work. [Read more...]

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155 Years Before the GIF: The First Looping Animations Created for the Phenakistoscope

Monday 12.02.2013 , Posted by

Phenakistoscope animations 2Phenakistoscope animations 8

A little while ago we covered the technology that went into Japanese band SOUR’s music video animated on spinning CDs… but that’s just the most recent in a long line of spinning disk animations. Almost 155 years before CompuServe launched their first animated GIF in 1987, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau created the Phenakistoscope – commonly regarded as the first device to display a true animation. [Read more...]

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What if Leonardo da Vinci Had a Smart Phone? Modern Mobile Devices in Classic Paintings

Friday 11.29.2013 , Posted by

Kim Dong-Kyu Modern Devices in Classic Paintings 1

With the holidays upon us, it’s now a common sight: instead of circling around the glow of the fireplace, people are huddling in front of their glowing smart phones, tablets and computers. Lamenting this technological, and sometimes antisocial shift, there is talk of changing the wifi password to kick people off the net… or else conversations are probably revolving around Youtube videos and Facebook posts going viral. But as we know, it hasn’t always been this way. Kim Dong-Kyu, a Korean illustrator and graphic artist, has been imagining what classic paintings would have looked like if modern technology had been so ingrained in the lives of the past. [Read more...]

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What Would History Look Like as Told Through Instagram?

Monday 11.25.2013 , Posted by

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“If something isn’t on the internet, it didn’t happen.” At least that’s what a lot of people seem to think in our modern age, when every birthday party, natural disaster or new creative pursuit has to show up on Facebook or Instagram. But what if the major historical events of the past happened today with our current social media obsession? What if DaVinci had posted instagram teasers showing his nearly completed Mona Lisa? What if someone posted a photo of the Trojan horse before its secret contents were revealed? That’s what MTV designers Gusto NYC and Gavin Alaoen set out to do on their hilarious new blog, Histagrams. [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: Woody Allen

Thursday 11.21.2013 , Posted by

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Woody Allen loves the writing process. He says he can get up in the morning and go write in his room. He is a workaholic. As soon as he has finished a script he cannot relax until he begins working on the next one.  He doesn’t believe in taking any time off, averaging one movie every year or so. As a director, comedian, screenwriter of his own films, playwright, writer of New Yorker articles, and even a clarinetist in a jazz band, he has made waves in every creative direction he has delved into. His films have incredible range, going from the broadest of comedies to the most serious of dramas and every shade in between. [Read more...]

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Totally Rad: Photographing Malls Across America (in 1989)

Monday 11.18.2013 , Posted by

Michael Galinsky Malls Across America 1

In 1989 Michael Galinsky set out driving across the country from Long Island, to North Dakota, and Washington State beyond. His mission? Documenting the malls of America as he went. His series is a time capsule from a transitioning country, where downtown districts continued to lose popularity and the “big box” malls became social and consumer hubs. Here teens roam with matching mullets, the elderly enjoy cigarettes inside, and ‘stonewash’ jeans had elastic at the bottom. [Read more...]

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Jennifer Greenburg Inserts Herself into Vintage Snapshots

Thursday 11.07.2013 , Posted by

Jennifer Greenburg Revisiting History 9

In her series Revisiting History, artist Jennifer Greenburg is replacing the individuals in vintage negatives she has found with the image of herself.I commandeer source material from someone else’s life thus taking over their memories to call my own,” she says. Her image is so seamlessly integrated with the original photograph that it is often impossible to decipher reality from fiction – which is exactly the point. [Read more...]

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Colorized Vintage Photos Make the Past Look Like Today

Thursday 11.07.2013 , Posted by

Colorized Historical Photos 1

While black and white photography is an excellent tool for bringing out form and shade in images, it fails miserably at one aspect: reality. For the years before the 1960s – before color photography went solidly mainstream – we are left with imagery that often fails to look like it really happened. Thanks to modern digital colorization tools however, artists like Sanna Dullaway, Dana Keller and Jordan Lloyd are updating the past, adding back in the missing element of color and giving us a window into history that’s more real than ever before. [Read more...]

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Laid To Rest Stops: Photos of Deserted Buildings By Noel Kerns

Tuesday 10.29.2013 , Posted by

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These homes, houses, and pit stops will not be seeing any eager trick-or-treaters this Halloween – except perhaps photographer Noel Kerns. Going door-to-door between abandoned shacks in isolated California towns such as Barstow, Yermo and the Salton Sea, Kerns captures peeling, finite facades painted against infinite nighttime skies. [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: Frank Lloyd Wright

Monday 10.14.2013 , Posted by

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Frank Lloyd Wright was a complex individual to understand. He was celebrated as a genius architect, which he undoubtedly was, but he was also an incredibly complex and flawed individual.

Wright is undeniably on the top of the list of great architects of history. He designed some of the greatest buildings of the twentieth century including Fallingwater, The Guggenheim Museum, The Imperial Hotel, the Johnson Wax Office Building, and his groundbreaking Prairie Style and Usonian houses. His buildings were an attractive organic-looking alternative to the boxiness of conventional Modernism. He used natural materials, preserved ornament, and hand-craft in construction. He emphasized the horizontal over the vertical, against the grain of the growth of skyscraper oriented cities which he detested. [Read more...]

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