One Size Does NOT Fit All: How Tom Burrell Changed the World of Advertising

Before Tom Burrell, the advertising world was a very different place. But in the age of Mad Men, he was something different, too: an African-American man in advertising.

This Visualization Will Help You Understand the Unbelievable Number of People Lost in WWII

The Fallen of World War II is a documentary visualization that gives us a heartrending perspective of the casualties lost during the conflict. Created by filmmaker Neil Halloran, the 18-minute short breaks down the war’s tragedies, stacking them into a sobering tally of the people who lost their lives.

With numbers reaching into the tens of millions, it is difficult to comprehend the magnitude of the war, or how it compares to the conflicts of today. But with Halloran’s exceptional comparisons and storytelling, the magnitude of World War II is made clear.

This Time-Lapse of One World Trade Center was 11-Years in the Making

This 2-minute time-lapse from EarthCam has been in creation since October 2004 when construction began on One World Trade Center. It finally wrapping up this year on Memorial Day 2015… 11-years later. Just released as the official time-lapse video of the building’s construction, it begins with below-ground utility relocations, footings, and foundations for the new building. It completes as the structure is sealed by its highly reflective windows and takes its place as the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, at 104 floors and 1,792 feet tall.

What Percentage of Your Life has the US Spent At War?

The Vietnam war was known for its length, but today the War on Terror has far surpassed it – stretching on for more than 13 years. For kids born in late 2001, there has never been a day when the United States wasn’t at war.

That sobering fact is clearly revealed in this excellent graphic created by The Washington Post. Here they chart the years in living memory that the US has been engaged in war, showing the percentage of people’s lives lived during times of war and peace.

A Gigantic 3D-Printed Zoetrope Based on Ruben’s Gruesome Painting, ‘Massacre of the Innocents’

British artist Mat Collishaw (previously) has built a huge 3D-printed zeotrope called All Things Fall. The highly detailed circular sculpture is populated by 350 different figures, environmental elements and architectural pieces which animate when the carousel is spun in front of a synchronised strobe light. In motion, a shockingly grisly scene is revealed.

Towering Villages in Yemen, Built from Mud Bricks

Unless you live in the coastal plains on its west coast, Yemen is one of the harshest places in the world. Most of the country is elevated, with high and dry desert plateaus and rugged mountains that receive so little water the country has no permanent rivers – only seasonal washes called “wadi” which remain dry except when summer rains sprinkle the landscape with life. Here is a place for hardy people. The Yemenis of Wadi Hadhramaut and Wadi Dawan, in eastern and central Yemen have built incredible towering villages from an unusual material – mud bricks.

A Portrait of Albert Einstein Made From 2200 Dice

A couple years ago, Redditor Joshie196 created a computer program that allowed him to turn any image into a dice mosaic. Combining his project with Einstein’s famous quote, “As I have said so many times, God doesn’t play dice with the world,” he turned 2200 dice into the face of this great scientist. The finished product weighs nearly 25lbs. He plans on inscribing Einsteins’ quote on the bottom of the frame and is willing to sell the work if the price is right. It cost over $350 to make and shipping would not be cheap due to its heavy weight.

In 1939, Pontiac Built a Transparent Car from Plexiglas

For the 1939-1949 World’s Fair in New York, Pontiac had a special surprise in store. Working in collaboration with chemical company Rohm & Haas, who had just developed a new product called “Plexiglas”, they created an entire body shell for a 1939 Pontiac Deluxe Six. It was soon dubbed the “Ghost Car.”

What’s the Most Popular Girl’s Name? This Video Tracks Their Evolution from 1880 to 2013

From Anna, to Jennifer and Isabella, the popularity of different girl names is always in flux. But what’s in a name? As this bubble chart animation illustrates, there’s a lot of cultural significance to how we name our girls. It tracks the changing favor of different names in America from all the way back in 1880 up to 2013. And while one name may hold the top position for a decade or two, parents are always swaying between following tradition and choosing something different or modern – eventually even the most popular names fall from the spotlight.

3 Artists Who Harnessed Inner Turmoil in the Pursuit of Creativity

Creating art is not an easy thing. As I talked about in my review of Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art, it can be a struggle, a battle even. Pressfield’s book was about overcoming the difficulty of getting down to work, of stopping procrastination and doing the thing you have to do. But there is another kind of creative struggle that many go through – the struggle with one’s self, with one’s inner demons.