A Nomadic Hot Tub You Can Heat With a Campfire? Yes!

When going through your list of things to pack for your next camping trip, don’t forget to bring the hot tub. Yes, that’s right. The Original Nomad is a portable hot tub that doesn’t take too much space or effort to get going. After a nice long hike in the woods, you and your friends (or even a lover) can get toasty and relaxed.

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A Magical Look Inside Utah’s Ice Castle, Captured by Photographer Sam Scholes

Like a mythical yeti’s cave or a home fit for the ice queen, this Ice Castle in Utah is something beautiful and mysterious to behold. Photographer Sam Scholes visited the hand built ice structure to capture it as the sun went down and the lights came on. Simply incredible.

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Magnificent Bookstore with a 19th Century Interior Opens in Romania

If you are a book lover, than this beautiful bookstore is the place to fall in love. Cărtureşti Carusel (“The Carousel of Light”) is a new store opening in the center of Bucharest. Built inside the cavernous interior of a 19th century building, the entire space features ornately detailed columns, stairways and balconies. With everything painted a brilliant white, its name is perfectly fitting.

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Man Hits The Thrift Store Jackpot When He Purchased A Rare Watch For $5.99

Macklemore isn’t the only one who enjoys poppin’ tags at the thrift shop. It was a lucky day when vintage watch fan Zach Norris walked into a Phoenix Goodwill store. He dug through the basket of dead battery Fossil watches and saw a label on a dial watch that caught his eye. It was a Jaeger LeCoultre watch marked at just $5.99. He knew it would be worth a lot more than that but how much more came as a surprise. The watch was a rare diving watch from 1959 of which less than 1,000 were made. Norris sold it on Hodinkee.com to a San Francisco watch collector for $35,000 plus an Omega Speedmaster (valued at $4,000).

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School Cafeteria Lunches Around the World

Each day in the United States, over 32 million students eat lunches from their school cafeterias. The food consumed accounts for more than half of each students daily calorie intake – which therefore makes the school cafeteria that much more important in delivering healthy food and preventing child obesity. Unfortunately, if you grew up going to an American school and eating food in the cafeteria, it is unlikely you got the most delicious and healthy food. Yet, if you grew up going to a school in another country around the world, you may have had a different experience.

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WWII Posters Declared War on STDs

Gigantic letters falling from the sky or giant dinosaurs stomping through the jungle might not be the first imagery that comes to mind when thinking of sexually transmitted diseases, but in World War II these posters were the military’s first line of defense against a venereal disease (VD) epidemic. Learning from the lessons of World War I, where many soldiers contracted and died from STDs, the US government started a graphic design war that saw military barracks plastered with posters warning of the dangers of unsafe promiscuity with “loose women.”

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A 1950s Kitchen, Locked Away Since It Was Built

Like walking back in time, furniture designer Nathan Chandler opened the door on a home he bought in 2010 and found the kitchen in nearly original condition from when it was built in 1956. For some reason the original owners built the house but never lived in it, keeping it sealed away and rarely using the pastel pink General Electric appliances that were installed from the start.

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Frozen Sand Sculpted by Strong Winds on Lake Michigan

Last week, photographer Joshua Nowicki was visiting St. Joseph on the shores of Lake Michigan when he spotted something very odd. Spread out on the beach were hundreds of small towers of sand, each about a foot tall. The tiny formations were created by a combination of freezing temperatures and very high winds (sometimes gusting to around 50 mph). Little by little the frozen sand eroded the beach around it, flowing like a river to form the beautiful canyon-like scene Nowicki captured with his camera.

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A Former Monk is Building this Giant Cathedral from Junk. He’s Been Working 52 Years.

In 1963 Justo Gallego Martinez began construction on the foundation for a grand cathedral in Mejorada del Campo, just outside of Madrid. Though he started with no architecture or construction training, the former monk has spent almost every day building his dream. Now 52 years later, his building towers 131 feet into the sky, far above the apartment buildings that surround it.

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Polarized Approval: Republican & Democrat Opinion of Every President Since Eisenhower

For Presidents Day, Pew Research Center produced an eye opening visualization of presidential approval over the past 62 years, ranging from the beginning of the Eisenhower administration to the latest poll for Barack Obama. Unlike most presidential approval charts, however, this one splits ratings by political party. Overall, 47% of Americans approve of Obama’s job performance (up from 42% in December), but that score hides a growing polarization between Democrats and Republicans.

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