NBA Study: Refs are Wrong 14% of the Time in Last 2 Minutes of Game

Starting March 1st, the National Basketball Association began releasing reports evaluating all calls and important non-calls which occur in the last two minutes of games. What did they find? In those final important moments, referees have made the wrong call or non-call in more than 14% of cases.

In 288 plays that the NBA considered, 7 whistled calls were wrong, while 34 no-calls were incorrect. If a win for your team is on the line, this isn’t very comforting news. However, Rod Thorn, the league’s president of basketball operations, said “The vast majority of the calls are right.” Referees made the correct call 96% of the time they blew the whistle.

One of These 4 Radical Bridges Will Be Built in London

In the center of London is the Nine Elms to Pimlico Bridge, a pedestrian and cyclist bridge over the River Thames that is in desperate need of a redesign. Calling on famous and emerging architects alike, a lively competition has been created to solicit ideas for the redesign. Four semifinalists have now been selected, and their designs are quite out of this world.

In Big Companies, CEOs Named John and David Outnumber All Women CEOs

You read that right. If you want to be a CEO, it’s probably time for a name change. According to a recent analysis of S&P 1500 companies, out of all the chief executives heading them up, an astounding 5.3% are named John. Right behind that is David, at 4.5%.

However, the truly sobering fact is just below: the total of every single female CEO is just 4.1%. That’s right, Johns and Davids outnumber female CEOs in this group.

What Do You Need to Do 5 Minutes of Killer Standup Comedy? This Graphic Breaks It Down

Standup comedy is an art, not a science—sort of. While it has its own formula (setup, punchline), it also has its own nuances. But it always starts with the standard 5-minute set, whether you’re doing your first open mic or your first late-night TV spot. What does it take to kill in that short amount of time? According to Comedy Evaluator Pro, an online software program that measures laughs and positive audience response during a comedy set, here’s what it takes.

Fantasy Meets Folk Art: Afro-Caribbean Inspired Paintings by Paul Lewin

Although he only lived in Kingston, Jamaica for 4 years before moving to Miami, Florida with his family, the impact of the Afro-Caribbean art left a lasting imprint on Paul Lewin’s style as an artist. Surrounded by cultural artifacts and art from around the world, Lewin’s paintings celebrate folklore, indigenous cultures, world religion, and ancient societies. Intricately detailed with a surreal twist, his acrylic paintings blend his global experience into a fantasy world. Currently based in Oakland, Lewin has a unique style that includes traditional Caribbean and African motifs as well as science fiction.

Willard Wigan Makes the Smallest Handmade Sculpture in History…In a Piece of Beard Stubble

Using a single hollowed out piece of his own beard stubble, microscopy artist Willard Wigan has created the world’s smallest sculpture. Under the microscope he turned a tiny flake of gold into a motorbike and inserted it into the 0.0035inch piece of stubble. With patience, dexterity, and extreme focus, Wigan has to hold his breath and make his movements between heartbeats. He challenges himself to make each fragile, miniature masterpieces more detailed and smaller than the previous ones. He has created several sculptures in the eye of a needle, but this beard stubble one gives a whole new meaning to the word tiny.

First Tintype Photographs In A Combat Zone Since The Civil War

Between combat missions in Afghanistan, Air Force defensive heavy weapons and tactics specialist, Ed Drew allowed art to keep his mind busy. With his old fashioned tin type photography equipment, Drew contrasted the past with the present. The photographs taken from the Civil War all used the tin type process and this technique has not been used in a combat zone since. On a 3 month deployment from April to June 2013, Drew captured these still portraits of his team, like a time warp back to 1865.

Low Income Students are Now a Majority In the Nation’s Public Schools

For the first time in recent history, a majority of the nation’s public school students are from lower income families. That’s the finding of the most recent report from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), which noted a striking increase over just a few decades. In 1989 for example, less than 32 percent of public school students were low-income. By 2000, the national rate had hit 38 percent. But the most marked rise has been over the last 15 years. Today 51% of public school students are from low-income families.

Blind Painter Uses Texture of Paint and His Sense of Touch to Create Vivid Paintings

Before going blind at age 30 due to epilepsy, John Bramblitt had never even painted before. Now he has published 2 books on painting, gives speeches at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and makes a living off of his colorful paintings. He claims to see more color now that he is blind than he did in his 29 years with vision.

The Top 50 Art Blogs to Follow

To continually cure your eyeball boredom, we are constantly keeping tabs on the internet’s finest content. As a Column Five project, we love uniting data with design, but we also like to highlight incredible artists, new technologies and amazing people. We have compiled a list of the 50 Top Art Blogs that we love to follow and think you will too. Since we’re crazy about data, we ranked our favorite blogs by the number of Facebook likes.