The Nature of War: A Veteran Recalls His Unlikely Friendship with Two Iraqi Boys

In this sad and beautiful cartoon, Oklahoma Army National Guard Specialist Justin Cliburn tells of his deployment in Iraq, where he formed an unlikely friendship with two young boys. He speaks with his wife, Deanne, about the lasting effect of that time and ponders the uncontrollable aspects of war.

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Elderly Toddlers Demonstrate That You Are As Young As You Feel

There is nothing cuter than a sweet old lady or man, except babies. This photo series combines the best of both worlds for some cuteness overload. For a New York Times article called “What if Age Is Nothing but Mind-Set?” about several behavioral psychology studies on aging, photographer Zachary Scott dressed up toddlers as grandparents. We love seeing animals in human clothes, but babies in adult clothes may have raised the aw-factor. With makeup, prosthetics, and a fair amount of photo editing, Scott made charming predictions of what six little kids might look like in 60 years.

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Origami Meets Mathematics In These Unbelievable Hand-Folded Designs

Sometimes it’s hard for non-math people to understand how anyone could be so passionate about it, but these tangible examples of mathematical topics make it easy for anyone to see the complex beauty. Using math to understand the laws behind paper folding, Professor Thomas C. Hull has created some origami sculptures that seem impossible. The geometric work above, called Pleated Multi-sliced Cone, was a collaboration between Hull and world renowned origami artist Robert J. Lang. Lang used a computer program called Mathematica to design the concept and crease pattern, which artist Ray Schamp printed on elephant hide paper, them Hull spent around 20 hours, over the course of 2 weeks, folding it into the final structure. In the video below, Hull discusses the implications of origami to show mathematical concepts and projections for the future of origami.

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Projection-Based Interactive Jewelry Of The Future by Neclumi

Neclumi asks, “Are we willing to abandon atoms of gold for the waves of light?” A brilliant jewelry line created in the minds of Polish art collective panGenerator, Neclumi necklaces and watches will make the future brighter. Trading in heavy metals for a picoprojector, the interactive jewelry will be run through a custom app with 4 options for movement. Airo mode will react to a pedometer to move with you as you walk. Sono mode will react to the ambient sound and your voice. Roto will use the compass to react to the rotation of your body. Movi will react to your body movement to bounce with you.

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This Danish Orchestra Ate the World’s Hottest Chili Peppers Before Playing

Members of the Danish National Chamber Orchestra recently played Tango Jalousie under the influence of one powerful substance: the world’s hottest chili peppers. Before performing the piece (by Danish composer Jacob Gade) each member downed one super-spicy chili: a Carolina Reaper, Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Blend or a Ghost Chili. These professionals held it together impressively… almost to the very end (a lot more impressive than standing there, like that video of 1,000 people eating ghost chilies that went viral earlier this year).

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Nothin’ But Lines: The Digital Designs of Patrick Seymour

With white lines on a black background, Patrick Seymour knows how to make an image pop. His creations appear to be 3D as he varies the thickness, curve, and direction of each line to achieve an astounding level of depth. From all corners of the animal kingdom to pop culture heroes and villains, each image features a perfect line of symmetry, further adding to the page popping contrast of the white on black. Seymour is based in Montreal, Canada where he works as the art director for PALM + HAVAS.

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Look Out Swiss Army Knife, There’s A New Tool In Town And It Doesn’t Require A Pocket

You never know where you’ll be when the screw on your glasses comes loose or you need a wrench or a ruler, but you can be prepared for anything with this amazingly designed hair clip from Leatherdos. You don’t need the bulk of a Swiss Army Knife in your pocket to fulfill all of its functions, all you need is this little metal clip. You can use it to hold back your bangs or hold your kippah in place. And if you don’t have hair, you can just clip it to your belt loop. It’s so light you won’t even remember it’s there. Boasting a flat head Phillips screwdriver, serrated cutting edge, 8mm wrench, ruler, trolley coin, small and large screwdriver, this is one useful piece of metal.

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20 Families That Went Totally Overboard for Halloween

For most people a simple Jack-o’-lantern on the front porch is enough for Halloween. Then there are families like these.

Suddenly their home becomes a miniature version of The Addams Family mansion, only it’s stuck in suburbia. Or, if you’re like one of the images here – there’s a full-on diorama of a Ghostbusters scene in the front yard. This is some next-level decorating, and we approve!

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What it’s Like to Spend 10 Hours Walking in NYC as a Woman

To truly understand someone, they say you need to “walk a mile in their shoes.” This shocking video certainly does that, bringing home the situation for women just about anywhere in Manhattan. Shoshana Roberts recently spent 10 hours walking the streets of NYC, being secretly filmed by Rob Bliss. The level of street harassment she endures is truly eye opening, and sometimes just downright creepy.

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This Guy Rode His Unicycle From Canada to Mexico to Fight Human Trafficking

As if the 2,755 mile Great Divide mountain bike trail from Banff, Canada to the Mexican border weren’t difficult enough, Gen Shimizu tackled it on a mountain unicycle! With a mission to raise money for Polaris Project and bring awareness to the modern day slavery that is human trafficking, he spent 88 days on the trail and documented his journal entries each night on his blog. Considering the fact that the profits from human trafficking exceed Google, Nike, and Starbucks combined, Shimizu’s efforts were much needed. From the contributions of people following the trip, Shimizu was able to raise $10,000 for Polaris Project.

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