Wes Anderson Designed a Bar. It’s Just as Quirky as You’d Imagine.

If you’ve dreamed of walking into the quirky, retro set of a Wes Anderson film, you’re far from alone. But unless you were film crew, that’s been impossible until now.

The lauded director recently designed the eccentric Bar Luce for Fondazione Prada, a new art and culture complex by Prada. Now you can walk into a space that looks right out of a Wes Anderson film, and even get a drink there.

Sometimes dreams do come true.

In 1939, Pontiac Built a Transparent Car from Plexiglas

For the 1939-1949 World’s Fair in New York, Pontiac had a special surprise in store. Working in collaboration with chemical company Rohm & Haas, who had just developed a new product called “Plexiglas”, they created an entire body shell for a 1939 Pontiac Deluxe Six. It was soon dubbed the “Ghost Car.”

Is This The Most Beautiful Bookshop In The World?

Books are a beautiful thing, but sometimes the building that houses them is even more captivating. The Livraria Lello (Lello Bookstore) is one of those cases. The art nouveau masterpiece is located in the center of Porto, Portugal, and features an incredible interior which wraps visitors in ornate neo-Gothic paneling and houses an unbelievable curving staircase as its central feature. Capping off the place is a colorful stained-glass ceiling.

WWII Posters Declared War on STDs

Gigantic letters falling from the sky or giant dinosaurs stomping through the jungle might not be the first imagery that comes to mind when thinking of sexually transmitted diseases, but in World War II these posters were the military’s first line of defense against a venereal disease (VD) epidemic. Learning from the lessons of World War I, where many soldiers contracted and died from STDs, the US government started a graphic design war that saw military barracks plastered with posters warning of the dangers of unsafe promiscuity with “loose women.”

A 1950s Kitchen, Locked Away Since It Was Built

Like walking back in time, furniture designer Nathan Chandler opened the door on a home he bought in 2010 and found the kitchen in nearly original condition from when it was built in 1956. For some reason the original owners built the house but never lived in it, keeping it sealed away and rarely using the pastel pink General Electric appliances that were installed from the start.

Before Business Cards: Trade Card Designs From the Victorian Era

Between 1870 and 1890, the most common and visible way to spread word about your business was through the form of “trade cards,” the predecessor to the modern business card. America shops would give them out after the sale of a product, and in turn, people would collect them and paste them in their scrapbooks. The most advertised cards in those days included medicine, food, tobacco, clothing, household and sewing items, stoves and farm supplies.

“Back to the Future II” Was Supposed to Happen in 2015. How Close Did It Get Today?

Two major milestones have been reached in 2015. This year marks the 30th anniversary of Back to the Future, and the year Marty McFly traveled to in the sequel, Back to the Future II. This has a lot of people asking one thing: “just how accurate did the second film get our current year?”

As with most future predictions, it’s a mixed bag. We’ve more than surpassed communication technology with smart phones (and thank goodness they’re not awkwardly strapped to our wrists)… but where’s my hoverboard??

Glamourous Cadillac Ads from the Height of The Great Depression

Things couldn’t get much more dismal for auto makers than the year 1931. Unemployment was nearing its all time high during The Great Depression leaving car buyers with empty pockets and manufacturers struggling to make ends meet. Most companies played it safe on expenditures, but Cadillac doubled down with a multitude of sleek models and better advertising than ever. They went to Europe and hired French illustrator Léon Bénigni to create a large collection of ads that were positively dripping with glamour.

“Merry Christmas Honey! I Got You a Vacuum!” 16 Awkwardly Vintage Christmas Ads

They sure don’t make ’em like they used to… especially when it comes to Christmas advertisements. They were sexist, weird and even downright unhealthy. So grab your matching family pajamas, light up a few smokes, and take a trip down memory lane with these gloriously bad mid-century ads.

A Radical Wooden Roadster Built from Plans (in 1959)

If you were “the least bit handy with ordinary tools and not afraid to get your hands dirty” you could build the car in these pictures, read an article in the September 1956 issue of Mechanix Illustrated magazine. We’re pretty sure you’d need to be more than “the least bit” skilled to build this from the minimal plans, but we won’t fault the author on his choice of interesting cars. The extremely low-slung roadster was built like a boat, out of materials people would be familiar with: plywood panels covered with mahogany. Now that’s different.