Colorful and Vibrant Prints of Iconic NYC

When Dutch illustrator and graphic designer Remko Heenskerk moved to New York City, he was inspired by the architecture—as many first-timers are. To pay homage, he created a series of iconic prints, featuring his favorite places. With vibrant colors and strong, clean lines, he captures the dynamism of the city’s many buildings and neighborhoods. Check out more of his portfolio on Behance or buy his prints on Inprint.

Propaganda Posters for Pyramid Schemes

You’d think the days of door-to-door knife salesmen and calling card pyramid schemes were over—but they’re only getting updated. Bulk protein? Cooking utensils? Somehow you still have an old roommate or third cousin trying to loop you into these ridiculous schemes with the promise to get rich quick. Inspired by these, we decided to have a little fun. Check out our propaganda posters for pyramid schemes. And while we have you here, can we interest you in a timeshare in Florida?

Super Cute Superheroes With Not So Super Part Time Jobs

In today’s economy, even superheroes need part-time jobs on the side to survive. It seems that saving the world doesn’t bring home the bacon anymore and illustrator Chow Hon Lam adorably designs these mega stars in the daily grind. Darth Vader uses his light saber to trim the hedges as a landscape laborer, Cat woman catches mice as an exterminator, while Spiderman uses his webs to make tennis rackets. See what the other superheroes are up to on the part-time job front below.

What if Major Brand Logos Were Hand-Lettered?

For her graphic design graduate project, Sara Marshall imagined what the intersection between modern brand logos and the classic art of hand-lettering might look like – and it’s very thought-provoking. Like many of us Marshall has noted the trend toward flat, minimalist brand logos. With companies like Microsoft and Google leading the way, the iconography of major companies has lost some of its flair in the name of simplicity, adopting a minimal range of colors and making creative use of negative space.

While there are some good design arguments for going minimal, it doesn’t always have to be so.

Late for the Plane? Tokyo’s Narita Airport Installed Intuitive Running Track Directions

You’ve probably been there before. You’re running late for a flight and the last thing you want to do is stop and read the confusing plethora of signs hanging overhead. That’s a stress inducing situation, but Tokyo’s Narita Airport may have the solution: the recently opened Terminal 3 has intuitive directions on a floor inspired by a running track.

“When the time arrives for 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, we look forward to seeing people from all around the world having fun walking on these blue tracks,” say the designers at PARTY. The smart new floor is so inspiring however, it might actually make you want to run.

Your Favorite Car Brand Histories, Illustrated With Just the Front Grill

If you’re anything like most car aficionados, you can name a car’s year and make just from a tail light or bumper. Chicago-based architect and designer Jerome Daksiewicz of NOMO is playing off that wheeled obsession with a series of 4 screen printed posters featuring only the front grill, bumper and headlights of iconic cars from the beginning of automotive history up to the modern day.

Architectural Typography Animated with Miniature People

For design lovers, it doesn’t get better than this. German creative firm Deepblue Networks just worked with illustrator and graphic designer Florian Schommer on a promotional campaign which hits just about all the right spots. They’ve combined bizarre architecture, animated GIFs, typography and even logo design into just one project. Here are 8 animated illustrations, each realized as a towering building in the form of one letter in the name ‘DEEPBLUE’.

WWII Posters Declared War on STDs

Gigantic letters falling from the sky or giant dinosaurs stomping through the jungle might not be the first imagery that comes to mind when thinking of sexually transmitted diseases, but in World War II these posters were the military’s first line of defense against a venereal disease (VD) epidemic. Learning from the lessons of World War I, where many soldiers contracted and died from STDs, the US government started a graphic design war that saw military barracks plastered with posters warning of the dangers of unsafe promiscuity with “loose women.”

Optical Illusion Bags That Look Like They’ve Jumped Out of a Comic Book

If Roy Lichtenstein had been in the bag business, it might have gone a lot like this. Jump From Paper has been designing playful bags that look as if they leapt from the pages of a vintage comic book – and just like the paper those stories were printed on, these bags look completely flat. Don’t be fooled though: it’s a clever optical illusion created with thick black piping and chunky blocks of color.

This Augmented Reality Calendar Jumps to Life on Your Phone

Wall and desk calendars are quickly becoming relics of the past, especially because the calendar app on your phone is way more useful. But here’s a mind blowing design that cleverly combines the physical and digital worlds – the Augmented Reality Calendar from We Are Royale.

The 2015 calendar was created as a Christmas gift for friends and clients of the company and features 12 months of letterpress cards that look fairly normal apart from their slick design.

But… download their AR Cal app on your iPhone, point it at the calendar and everything jumps to life right in your hand. Mustaches jump off the page, characters stand up, and it’s all interactive.