Time-Warping Rainbows in Vintage Moments: Hannah Dansie

Hannah Dansie

Why are we limited to five senses when perceiving the world? We know that there is more energy out there than humans can naturally detect. There are radical frequencies in sound, extremes in color, and visualization of heat. But, what about visual perception of emotion or the intensity of a moment?  What would the energy have looked like at Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech? Or at your birthday party as you were blowing out the candles?  Painter Hannah Dansie explores these ideas in her surreal artwork which captures a mysterious energy that seems to transcend space and time. The simple but powerful images repeatedly present the same ‘sixth sense’ without explanation. The suspense of mystery keeps you flipping through image after image hopelessly searching for clues as to the origin of the colorful explosions. The geometric bursts appear to be a visual representation of accumulated energy that stems from every emotion that has ever been, or will ever be, connected to that single instant.

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How Creatives Work: Frank Lloyd Wright

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Frank Lloyd Wright was a complex individual to understand. He was celebrated as a genius architect, which he undoubtedly was, but he was also an incredibly complex and flawed individual.

Wright is undeniably on the top of the list of great architects of history. He designed some of the greatest buildings of the twentieth century including Fallingwater, The Guggenheim Museum, The Imperial Hotel, the Johnson Wax Office Building, and his groundbreaking Prairie Style and Usonian houses. His buildings were an attractive organic-looking alternative to the boxiness of conventional Modernism. He used natural materials, preserved ornament, and hand-craft in construction. He emphasized the horizontal over the vertical, against the grain of the growth of skyscraper oriented cities which he detested.

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How Creatives Work: John Cage

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John Cage is one of the most controversial and important figures in the history of music. He made his mission to redefine how we think about musical composition and performance, creativity, and ultimately life. The important conclusion he reached about music in particular was that it could be anything. Any sound we hear in the course of our daily life could be enjoyed and appreciated in and of itself in the same way as we appreciate a Mozart sonata. We just needed to turn up our ears and our brains, to train and stretch them in order to experience the world around us in a different, more active way.

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New York Crime Photos – Superimposing Then and Now (Warning: Graphic)

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Alongside all the glitz and glamour, New York has always had a grim and grisly side. Mark Hermann, photographer and historian for the New York Press Photographers Association, has stitched together imagery collected from the New York Daily News archive, showing crime photos from the not-so-distant past, superimposed on the sanitized New York of today. Be warned – his film-noir-esq images are not for the faint of heart.

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Pastoral Paintings Hidden on the Edge of Old Books

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Here’s something that will have you bending all the classic books in your house: fore-edge painting, the art of hiding illustrations and paintings on the outer edges of a book. The technique, which is said to date back to as early as the 1650s, was recently brought to the webs attention by Colossal, who shared brilliant examples of the result in GIF form.

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How Creatives Work: Akira Kurosawa

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Akira Kurosawa is respected as one of the greatest film directors who ever lived, and as a master of the Samurai genre of Japanese cinema. Films such as “Rashomon,” “Seven Samurai,” Ran,” “Throne of Blood,”  “Yojimbo,” and others, revolutionized cinema and introduced Japanese film to Western audiences. He always said he didn’t like talking about particular films after he had finished them. He wanted them to do the talking for him. “If what I have said in my film is true,” he explained, “someone will understand.”

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Thugs, Thieves, Killers & Hookers- Vintage Mugshots from the 1920’s

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On weekends at the Justice & Police Museum in Sydney, Australia, visitors can see mugshots from a series of 2500 photographs taken by the New South Wales Police Department to keep track of their inmates from 1910-1930. Curated by Peter Doyle, this exhibition called City of Shadows tells the stories of prostitutes, thieves, murderers, and thugs back in the day. Doyle describes it as “an intimate, raw and hauntingly beautiful record of the mysterious people and dark places of a Sydney lost.” With hand-written names and dates above street-clothed criminals, the forensic photographs are a fascinating relic of another era.

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The Storied Evolution of the Star Wars Logo

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When it comes to movie logos (or franchises for that matter) there are few as iconic as the now classic Star Wars trilogy… but how well do we really know the design behind that logo? As it turns out, the famously “spacy” typography featured in the now familiar logo wasn’t finalized on all print media until a while after the first movies release, and some early versions slipped through becoming quite familiar in their own right.

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Anti-Mario Propaganda Posters Inspired by WWII

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Just when you thought your mission to save the princess was in the bag, along come’s anti-Mario propaganda from the mushroom kingdom: “The Koopas are Fighting, Why Aren’t You?” Each of these 17 posters, including the new 7 just released, pay homage to the iconic propaganda posters of WW2. Planting a Victory Garden? In this case, the plants fight back!

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Is it Copying, Remixing, or Just Chance? Website asks of similar artworks: Who Wore It Better?

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Call it a copy, call it a tribute… we might think we’re in the age of the remix, but we’re not: this has been going on for a long, long time. Just check out the mind blowing Everything is a Remix series by Kirby Ferguson or these creative comparisons from a fantastic site that asks: Who Wore It Better? Whether it’s Roy Lichtenstein directly appropriating comic book art from Joe Simon & Jack Kirby (and making a small fortune on the subsequent paintings), or van Gogh reworking Jean-François Millet’s painting in his own impressionistic style, there have been centuries of inspired ideas passed from one creative individual to the next… and even our most exalted heroes of creativity aren’t exempt from the practice. After all, as Picasso reportedly said, “Good artists copy. Great artists steal.”

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