Data + Design Project

Michael Cho’s Superheroes are Super Retro

Tuesday 01.07.2014 , Posted by
Michael Cho Retro Illustrations 11

Two things that really flourished during the ‘50s: illustration and comic books. Toronto-based artist and illustrator Michael Cho has perfectly combine those two trends in deliciously retro fashion, creating handmade fan art the old fashioned way. Featuring your favorite heroes of yesteryear – from Superman and Thor, to Batman and Ironman – his work is exceedingly positive and makes you feel that all is right in the world… and if it isn’t, he’ll show us who to turn to. [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: The Visual Playground of Charles and Ray Eames

Friday 12.20.2013 , Posted by
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Charles and Ray Eames were more than just designers. One of the visual arts most famous and influential married couples, they redefined much of the world that now surrounds us. They also touched multiple disciplines, leaving their mark on architecture, furniture design, interior design, exhibition design, toy design, fine art, photography, and film. They saw themselves as educators and they were definitely innovators. [Read more...]

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Old Salt Mine in Romania Turned Into an Amusement Park

Thursday 12.19.2013 , Posted by
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Salina Turda is a modern day Cave of Wonders. Except instead of being filled with glitter and gold, the cave is home to a much saltier history. [Read more...]

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Santa Claus Invades 24 Classic Paintings

Monday 12.16.2013 , Posted by
Ed Wheeler Santa Classics 7

That jolly old elf Santa Claus is up to some art history shattering shenanigans this christmas. With some assistance from his little helper, photographer Ed Wheeler, Santa has found himself riding Napoleon’s horse across the alps, crossing the Delaware river, decorating one of Mondrian’s paintings with a wreath and even becoming God. [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: The Ever Playful Alexander Calder

Thursday 12.05.2013 , Posted by

American-Sculptor-Alexander-Calder-photographerd-by-Hungarian-Photographer-Andre-Kertes-in-Paris-France-1929

Alexander Calder made play the major theme of his art. Over the course of more than fifty years, he worked harder than most in the pursuit of the creation of his own universe, invented a whole new genre, an art of moving sculpture known as ‘mobiles,’ and made works on an unsurpassed scale. But he was also an incredibly interesting character, a man who had a childlike view of life which translated seamlessly into his work. [Read more...]

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155 Years Before the GIF: The First Looping Animations Created for the Phenakistoscope

Monday 12.02.2013 , Posted by

Phenakistoscope animations 2Phenakistoscope animations 8

A little while ago we covered the technology that went into Japanese band SOUR’s music video animated on spinning CDs… but that’s just the most recent in a long line of spinning disk animations. Almost 155 years before CompuServe launched their first animated GIF in 1987, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau created the Phenakistoscope – commonly regarded as the first device to display a true animation. [Read more...]

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Jennifer Greenburg Inserts Herself into Vintage Snapshots

Thursday 11.07.2013 , Posted by

Jennifer Greenburg Revisiting History 9

In her series Revisiting History, artist Jennifer Greenburg is replacing the individuals in vintage negatives she has found with the image of herself.I commandeer source material from someone else’s life thus taking over their memories to call my own,” she says. Her image is so seamlessly integrated with the original photograph that it is often impossible to decipher reality from fiction – which is exactly the point. [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: The Emotional Performance Art of Marina Abramović

Friday 10.25.2013 , Posted by

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It is 2010 and a woman sits in the atrium of The Museum of Modern Art. She wears a white robe and across from her sits someone else, a museum patron, or more generally a human being. The woman sits motionless, staring straight into the face of the person facing her, not looking away or breaking eye contact for any reason. When the patron in front of her feels like they have had the experience they wanted, they get up and walk away. The woman looks down with eyes shut, preparing herself for the next person. [Read more...]

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Time-Warping Rainbows in Vintage Moments: Hannah Dansie

Friday 10.18.2013 , Posted by

Hannah Dansie

Why are we limited to five senses when perceiving the world? We know that there is more energy out there than humans can naturally detect. There are radical frequencies in sound, extremes in color, and visualization of heat. But, what about visual perception of emotion or the intensity of a moment?  What would the energy have looked like at Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech? Or at your birthday party as you were blowing out the candles?  Painter Hannah Dansie explores these ideas in her surreal artwork which captures a mysterious energy that seems to transcend space and time. The simple but powerful images repeatedly present the same ‘sixth sense’ without explanation. The suspense of mystery keeps you flipping through image after image hopelessly searching for clues as to the origin of the colorful explosions. The geometric bursts appear to be a visual representation of accumulated energy that stems from every emotion that has ever been, or will ever be, connected to that single instant. [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: Frank Lloyd Wright

Monday 10.14.2013 , Posted by

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Frank Lloyd Wright was a complex individual to understand. He was celebrated as a genius architect, which he undoubtedly was, but he was also an incredibly complex and flawed individual.

Wright is undeniably on the top of the list of great architects of history. He designed some of the greatest buildings of the twentieth century including Fallingwater, The Guggenheim Museum, The Imperial Hotel, the Johnson Wax Office Building, and his groundbreaking Prairie Style and Usonian houses. His buildings were an attractive organic-looking alternative to the boxiness of conventional Modernism. He used natural materials, preserved ornament, and hand-craft in construction. He emphasized the horizontal over the vertical, against the grain of the growth of skyscraper oriented cities which he detested. [Read more...]

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