A Timeline of Underground Queer Cinema

The history of cinema is filled with life stories, but few that depict the LGBT community. In its century long existence, main stream cinema has typically shied away from the subject, deeming it too controversial or unpopular – but there were films being made. Fandor pulled together 50 films, both underground and mainstream, which paved the way for greater expression in queer cinema.

Lessons from a Master of Cinema: How Akira Kurosawa Composed Movement

If you haven’t seen Tony Zhou’s excellent series Every Frame A Painting (previously), you are in for a treat. His videos dissect the work of filmmaking masters in a way that will have you appreciating (or loathing) most films you see afterward.

3 Artists Who Harnessed Inner Turmoil in the Pursuit of Creativity

Creating art is not an easy thing. As I talked about in my review of Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art, it can be a struggle, a battle even. Pressfield’s book was about overcoming the difficulty of getting down to work, of stopping procrastination and doing the thing you have to do. But there is another kind of creative struggle that many go through – the struggle with one’s self, with one’s inner demons.

Pee Wee Herman is Coming Back in a New Movie Produced by Netflix!

If you grew up in 1980s America, there’s a good chance you saw an episode or two (or forty five) of the wild TV show, Pee Wee’s Playhouse. Hosted by actor Paul Reubens, (aka “Pee Wee Herman”) there were a myriad of bizarre friends and guests who would visit his funky playhouse. There was Chairry the talking armchair, Jambi the genie, and a bohemian animal jazz band just to name a few. Now it has been officially announced that Netflix will be releasing a new movie with Pee Wee called “Pee Wee’s Big Holiday.”

WWII Posters Declared War on STDs

Gigantic letters falling from the sky or giant dinosaurs stomping through the jungle might not be the first imagery that comes to mind when thinking of sexually transmitted diseases, but in World War II these posters were the military’s first line of defense against a venereal disease (VD) epidemic. Learning from the lessons of World War I, where many soldiers contracted and died from STDs, the US government started a graphic design war that saw military barracks plastered with posters warning of the dangers of unsafe promiscuity with “loose women.”

Before Business Cards: Trade Card Designs From the Victorian Era

Between 1870 and 1890, the most common and visible way to spread word about your business was through the form of “trade cards,” the predecessor to the modern business card. America shops would give them out after the sale of a product, and in turn, people would collect them and paste them in their scrapbooks. The most advertised cards in those days included medicine, food, tobacco, clothing, household and sewing items, stoves and farm supplies.

Black and White Photos Wiped into Color

There’s probably no better way to see the power of the colorizing technique than with these animated GIFs from the Dutch design website NSMBL. Taking iconic images from around the web, they’ve overlaid colorized versions of the same image that is slowly revealed with a animated series of wipes. It’s like seeing each photograph wiped into reality.

Movie Theaters Had Very Different Rules in 1912

You’ve seen it many times. You’re sitting there waiting for your movie to start, but first this message plays across the screen: “For the comfort of those around you, please silence your cell phone.” While you may think that this is simply an aspect of our modern era, it’s actually been a practice since the very start of film.

These fantastic movie theater etiquette slides from 1912 show many of the same rules as today (like keeping quiet and not standing up) and plenty that we wouldn’t even consider being a problem – like wearing really huge hats.

Glamourous Cadillac Ads from the Height of The Great Depression

Things couldn’t get much more dismal for auto makers than the year 1931. Unemployment was nearing its all time high during The Great Depression leaving car buyers with empty pockets and manufacturers struggling to make ends meet. Most companies played it safe on expenditures, but Cadillac doubled down with a multitude of sleek models and better advertising than ever. They went to Europe and hired French illustrator Léon Bénigni to create a large collection of ads that were positively dripping with glamour.

What to Wear in 1906: A Street Fashion Photographer From Edwardian Engand

Over a century before The Sartorialist was stopping fashionable people to capture their unique sense of style, photographer Edward Linley Sambourne (1844-1910) was documenting the street fashion of Edwardian England. Sambourne worked as chief cartoonist for the English magazine Punch, and as an illustrator. When he first picked up photography, it was to use as reference to improve upon his other arts, but soon it turned into an obsession.