A Gigantic 3D-Printed Zoetrope Based on Ruben’s Gruesome Painting, ‘Massacre of the Innocents’

British artist Mat Collishaw (previously) has built a huge 3D-printed zeotrope called All Things Fall. The highly detailed circular sculpture is populated by 350 different figures, environmental elements and architectural pieces which animate when the carousel is spun in front of a synchronised strobe light. In motion, a shockingly grisly scene is revealed.

Blind Mother Can “See” Her Baby’s Ultrasound Thanks to 3D Printing Technology

Seeing an ultrasound of her unborn baby for the first time is a milestone that an expectant mother will never forget. A little preview of the bundle of joy that she will soon get to hold in her arms. But for a blind mother, the ultrasound only tells her that her baby is healthy and then she has to wait until birth to know what her baby looks like. But this lucky mother got an unexpected surprise. A doctor used a 3D printer to create a life sized image of her baby’s face so that she could feel what it looks like. The joy on her face as she touches her baby’s “face” for the first time is absoloutely heartwarming.

Get Ready for the First 3D Printed Short Film

French artist Gilles-Alexandre Deschaud is about to make history by debuting the first short film made completely with 3D-printed pieces. The film “Chase Me” uses nearly 2500 individual pieces to create the story of a young ukulele carrying girl on a walk through the mysterious forest. While others have created 3D printed animations, this will be the first that could be called a short film.

We’re All Afraid of Something. This Little Animation Shows How That Can Be Good.

Fear is so pervasive it could be the main human condition. It’s an emotion that follows those who seem to have everything together, and those who can’t leave the house.

But is it really all bad?

For her graduation from Vancouver Film School, San Francisco-based animator and illustrator Nata Metlukh made an exceptional short film which looks creatively at the upside of fear. It’s charming characters challenge us to re-asses the way we look at this common emotion, and schools us in the possibility that embracing it might just take away its power.

The First and Last Frames of 55 Famous Films, Compared Side-by-Side

Out of the many shots in a film, the first and last are among the most considered. Filmmaker Jacob T. Swinney took 55 films and set those opening and closing shots side-by-side. In doing so, he reveals that many scenes are decidedly similar to one another, while others are absolutely different. What were the filmmakers trying to say with each of these beginnings and endings? Like the opening and closing of any story, each serves a purpose.

A Single Day on the London Tube Condensed Into a 2-minute Visualization

Everyday an average of 3.5 million people ride the London tube. Where is everyone going, and when are the busiest times? Developer Will Gallia was curious to see it visualized, so he gathered a day’s worth of data and created a timelapse visualization. 

Is This the Most Amazing “Save The Date” Video Ever?

Some people call Tyler MacNiven the most interesting young man living in San Francisco. He has walked the length of Japan in search of the birthplace of his father, wrestled 100 worthy opponents in Mongolia, run across the country of Iran for peace, and even won the Amazing Race. Yet through all the adventures, the grandest of all might be his love for Kelly Hennigan, his bride to be.

Two Holocaust Survivors Form a Band in Their Eighties

Last summer Saul Dreier and Reuwen (“Ruby”) Sosnowicz formed a band. While that isn’t too unusual, it is if you are in your mid-to-late eighties and survived the Holocaust.

Pulling from the music of their youth in Poland, the two formed a klezmer band, with the 89-year-old Mr. Dreier on the drums, and 85-year-old Mr. Sosnowicz playing the accordion. Together with their group, the two have performed for audiences in the local nursing homes and temples around their home near Boca Raton, Florida, and on one occasion traveled to Las Vegas to perform at The Venetian. The name of their group? The Holocaust Survivor Band.

Journey Through an Ever Evolving Fractal Forest

Juilius Horthuis takes us on a journey through a lush and evolving forest made of fractals. His video experiment, Where Forests Are… continues a series of exploratory work inspired by the natural world. Horthuis calls his poetic work “a fractal haiku.”

Lessons from a Master of Cinema: How Akira Kurosawa Composed Movement

If you haven’t seen Tony Zhou’s excellent series Every Frame A Painting (previously), you are in for a treat. His videos dissect the work of filmmaking masters in a way that will have you appreciating (or loathing) most films you see afterward.