Check Out What These Three Sisters Did to Liven Up Their Grandmother’s Town

It took the creative minds of three sisters to entirely transform an otherwise common town in Taiwan. Nobody really had a desire to visit the town of Huija, other than to attend one of the three temple gatherings each year. It didn’t help that drab grays and blues on old brick was the popular style there. But that’s different now.

While visiting their grandmother’s house on holiday, the three sisters decided to bring some life to the place. They got some supplies and painted the outside of her house with their favorite cartoon characters including Daruma Dolls, which are a symbol of luck in Japan. What happened next no one in the town could have expected.

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Speedy Graphito: A French Street and Pop Art Legend

A pioneer of the street art movement in France, Speedy Graphito brought the avant-garde to the streets and inspired a generation of future artists. Expressed in many mediums, his work is bold, vibrant and controversial – and while a good amount of his creativity is paint-based, he also works with sculpture, installations, video and photography.

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The World Is A Yoga Mat: Urban Yoga in New York, Paris, Madrid and Ljubljana

Yogi, architect and artist Anja Humljan encourages us to re-observe our busy cities, seeing them as world to deeply interact with, and even a place to de-stress. For her collaborative project and upcoming book, The Urban Yoga, she traveled to world cities, exploring their concrete and steel environments and how they interact with the human body.

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Photographer Builds Detailed Sets in the Streets of New York (Then Leaves Them for People to Enjoy)

Walk down the street in New York and you could see a living room, bedroom or bathroom right on the sidewalk. It’s an ongoing art project from photographer Justin Bettman and stylist Gozde Eker called Set in the Street. It sees the duo building elaborate sets right out in the open using discarded materials and furniture. In fact, most of their materials are found on the street and have simply changed locations.

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Window Silhouettes Play with the World Outside

Spanish street artist Pejac is no stranger to the art of the silhouette. Even when doing highly detailed paint work his pieces often incorporate some form of clever black and white figure or shape. One way he’s experimented with silhouettes is on the windows of his apartments, most recently creating a playful tribute to French high-wire artist Philippe Petit. Here, in an imaginative use of forced-perspective, the tightrope walker balances on a jet’s vapor trail.

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Shh, Don’t Wake These Sleepy Kids!

Nap time has the unfortunate tendency of disappearing once you reach adulthood. French photographer Alice Lemarin captures the childhood privilege of dozing whenever and wherever you want in her Sleeping series.

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Street Art On The Railroad Tracks of Portugal

Throughout the history of street art, train cars and the tunnels they pass through have served as a canvas for street artists to make their mark. In Portugal, artist Artur Bordalo has used a slightly different canvas to put his work on: the tracks themselves. Is this now what we call Rail Art? It could be.

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Silhouettes Play on the Streets of Padua

The streets of Padua Italy are filled with playful silhouettes by local street artist Kenny Random. Kenny, whose real name is Andrea Coppo has been practicing the art form since the eighties, and over the years his style has ranged from anthropomorphic figures, stenciled silhouettes and a myriad of cartoon characters which interact with each other.

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Incredibly Realistic Interiors Carved into Marble & Stone

With a degree in Art History, specializing in art and architecture, Matthew Simmonds is in a small group of people who actually used their college degree for their job. His studies led him to train as an architectural stone carver and worked with teams in the restoration of famous historic buildings like the Westminster Abbey and Ely Cathedral in England. In 1996, after he moved to Italy, Simmonds began carving classical fine arts sculptures in marble and just 3 years later won first prize at the Verona International Sculpture Symposium. Simmonds’ miniature architectural carvings are as beautiful as their full sized counterparts. The meticulous details on such a small scale are even more impressive. The rough edges of the original stone slabs contrast with his clean carvings in a beautiful way.

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Trash Can Back Packs Bring Humor to the Busy Streets of Sao Paolo

While it’s important to have trash cans sprinkled throughout a city, they aren’t the most beautiful thing to look at. A trio of young German street artists known as Mentalgassi have teamed up with famous Brazilian street artist Mundano to add a little life to the mundane in Sao Paolo. They turned trash cans into back packs and the poles that they are mounted to into black & white characters happily wearing the trash pack. Who could ever litter when throwing out the trash is this much fun?

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