Surprising New Paste Ups Interact with the Street

Street artist/street modifier OakOak (previously) has been hard at work over the past year, transforming the streets into playgrounds for characters large and small. The French artist is a specialist in street interventions, using derelict objects like bent pipes, cracked pavement and nightly shadows as inspiration for his surprising brand of art.

Charles Leval Makes Art That Interacts With the Streets of Paris

French street artist Charles Leval (aka Levalet) is pasting up Paris with highly original artwork that interacts with the street itself. With his talented eye, a metal grate turns into an umbrella, a advertising box becomes an x-ray machine, and a sculptural Minotaur’s head grows a body (doing a maze of course).

Slinkachu’s “Miniaturesque”: More Miniature People Take Over the Urban World

London-based artist Slinkachu (featured previously) has been hard at work creating some of the smallest street art we’ve seen. That’s not to demean its importance (though you might just miss it walking down the street). His tiny miniatures have been cleverly installed all over the city and parklands of London, creating humorous and surprising scenes of tiny figurines interacting with the larger world.

Skaters Build a Railroad Riding Half-Pipe & Rowboat Ramp in the Latest Film From Zenga Bros.

You might recall the Zenga Bros. from their energy charged, nostalgia inducing film Ski Boys (and if you haven’t seen it yet, I’m envious). Now they’re back with a new short that’s equally enthralling. They worked with a load of skaters to create imaginatively artistic mobile skate ramps like you’ve never seen before. One is a railroad-traveling half-pipe with a conductors cabin on either end. Just roll it down the rails for a different view.

Exclusive Interview with Oxygen Channels “Street Art Throwdown” Artist CAMER1

One of today’s best known street artists in the San Francisco Bay Area is Camer1. After 20 years of bringing his art to the city, he was chosen along with 9 other street artists to compete in a new Oxygen Channel show called “Street Art Throwdown“. Hosted by famous street artist Justin BUA and Lauren Wagner, the TV series will feature a range of challenges for the artists. In the end, a winner will walk away with $100,000 and some added respect.

Speedy Graphito: A French Street and Pop Art Legend

A pioneer of the street art movement in France, Speedy Graphito brought the avant-garde to the streets and inspired a generation of future artists. Expressed in many mediums, his work is bold, vibrant and controversial – and while a good amount of his creativity is paint-based, he also works with sculpture, installations, video and photography.

Photographer Builds Detailed Sets in the Streets of New York (Then Leaves Them for People to Enjoy)

Walk down the street in New York and you could see a living room, bedroom or bathroom right on the sidewalk. It’s an ongoing art project from photographer Justin Bettman and stylist Gozde Eker called Set in the Street. It sees the duo building elaborate sets right out in the open using discarded materials and furniture. In fact, most of their materials are found on the street and have simply changed locations.

Adorable Anamorphic Chalk Creatures Make The Streets of Ann Arbor More Playful

For the past 13 years, street artist and illustrator David Zinn has been making his neighborhood a little bit brighter with temporary art. His whimsical chalk art uses the sidewalk, brick buildings, and cement walls as canvases for his little creatures to come to life. Although there is only one angle that reveals the 3D nature of his characters, the people of Ann Arbor are often rewarded for looking down at the ground. His characters include fish, mice, monsters, a flying pig named Philomena, and a green alien named Sluggo, who boasts 3,409 fans on Facebook.

Keep Off the Lawn: A Giant Climbs Out of the Ground in Budapest

A giant recently climbed out of the ground in front of Széchenyi Square in Budapest, Hungary… or so it appeared. The towering outdoor sculpture was part of a pop-up installation for Art Market Budapest, a contemporary art fair that happened earlier in October. The sculpture by artist Ervin Loránth Hervé was made from polystyrene and covered with turf patches to look like the grass was being ripped from the ground (hence the sculptures name, “Feltépve”, which means “Ripped Up”).

Window Illusions on the Streets of Istanbul

Spanish street artist Pejac recently took a trip to Istanbul, using his time there to give the city a few new windows (in his own illusory street art style of course). His work fits seamlessly into the local architecture and would probably be missed if they weren’t so interesting and different. While in the ancient city, he created a piece that looks like a keyhole, a gothic arched window, and a tiny window with massive wooden shutters.