As If Knitting With Yarn Weren’t Hard Enough, Carol Milne Knits With Glass

I can’t think of cooler sculptures to give to a knitting aficionado, or anyone for that matter. Carol Milne does the unthinkable as she creates these fragile pieces that look like knitted glass. A long and complicated process that she created herself in 2006, Milne begins with a wax model, which is then surrounded by a refractory mold material (that can hold up in high temperatures). After the mold sets, she steams the wax out of the mold and replaces it with chunks of room temperature glass. The piece is then placed in a kiln and heated to 1400- 1600 degrees Fahrenheit, which melts the glass into the grooves formerly occupied by the wax. The glass is slowly cooled (can take weeks) to prevent cracking. When it is finished annealing, the mold is carefully picked away and voila!

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Single Stranded Wire Twisted By Hand Into Beautiful Tree Sculptures

With the length of almost 4 football fields (378 yards) in wire, sculptor Clive Maddison created the beautiful tree above. This particular model has over 17,000 loops in the canopy, and it is mounted on a piece of Sweet Chestnut. As with all of his tree models, there is no glue or solder involved. The sculptures stay put solely from the twists of each strand, making each one unique. Starting from the base, which is often a piece of wood that matches the type of tree he will be sculpting, Maddison twists his way up from roots to trunk to branches to leaves.

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Atmospheric & Eerie Sculptures Built in Aquariums

Mariele Neudecker creates fantastic sculptures inside large water filled aquariums. Using an intriguing combination of materials, including chemicals to create eerie atmospheric effects, her “Tank Works” invite viewers to move closer and explore the world within.

Her sculptures take their inspiration from romantic paintings and photographs, using lighting to create life-like sunbeams and dense fog around sculptures of mountains, trees and even a model sailing ship. Like the real world, the chemistry-based atmosphere in the tank has a life of its own, slowly changing over time to create new environments.

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This Incredible Hulk Sculpture is Totally Nuts (Yes, It’s Made From Them)

I’d like to say this Hulk sculpture is life-like, but we’re talking about a made-up superhero here. Let’s just say finding it down a dark alley would make you consider turning around…

Built by Thailand’s BanHunLek, the piece was built from scrap metal like most of the work from their shop. Pulling apart old rusting cars to salvage the metal bits is all in a day’s work. In the case of their latest Hulk sculpture (it’s not their first) the weathered surface just makes it much more tough. The most impressive part: look close, and it’s made almost entirely from nuts welded together.

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These Toy Soldiers Have Traded in their Guns for Yoga Poses

The Warrior pose has never been more fitting than for Dan Abramson’s series of toy soldiers: Yoga Joes. Soon to be launched through Kickstarter, his hilarious toy soldiers have put down their weapons and are in the middle of a peaceful yoga session. Just what you need after combatting a long day.

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This New Book Features the Darkest LEGOs We’ve Ever Seen

These certainly aren’t your kid’s LEGOs. Famed brick building artist and author Mike Doyle is back with another book of LEGO-based art – this time with a decidedly spooky theme. With chapters titled Creepy Crawlers, Dark Towers, Indulgences, Evil Attunement, Pits of Fire, and even Riot Girls, the new book, called Beautiful LEGO 2: Dark, is decidedly lacking in fairy tale castles or race cars.

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Food-Specific Silverware Sticks A Fork Into Bad Table Manners

Can’t tell a salad fork from a soup spoon? Israeli designer Lee Ben David puts the confusion to rest with her “Very Specific” cutlery set, in which each utensil is designed to be used for one particular–and typically tricky to eat–food item.

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These Dioramas Look Real… Until the Artist Puts His Hand in the Shot

If you’ll humor me, I’d like to call these tiny dioramasminiature miniatures.” Japanese artist Satoshi Araki’s teeny tiny models are rich in detail, so much in fact, that they look like reality when captured under his careful lighting. But then he puts his finger in the shot and their true scale is revealed. Impressive.

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Old Skateboards Stacked, Shaven, & Polished Into Colorful Wooden Mosaic Sculptures

An avid skater with an infatuation for all things skateboarding and art, Haroshi found a way to combine his passions and re-purpose old, broken skateboards at the same time. The sculptor collects broken skate decks and turns them into beautiful, 3D wooden mosaic art works. In this series called HARVEST, he re-purposed skate decks into colorful creatures, including pop culture icons like Mario. Some of his designs are 2D wall mosaics, others look like smooth colored statues. A fun fact about Haroshi’s 3D sculptures is that they also have a metal part from broken boards hidden inside their layers of wood, which he believes give soul to the statue. The idea for this came from 12th Century Japanese Buddha sculptor Unkei who would place a crystal ball inside the sculpture where the Buddha’s heart would be.

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Florentijn Hofman’s Gigantic Lounging Bunny Meets a Fiery End

You’ve definitely seen the work of Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman before. He’s the creator of the world’s largest rubber duck that’s been slowly floating to harbors around the world. Now he’s created a bunny sculpture that is no less gigantic. Called “Moon Rabbit” the sculpture was part of the Taoyuan Land Arts Festival located at Dayuan Town Naval Base in Taiwan. The piece was made as a homage to East Asian folklore, which talks of a rabbit that lives on the moon (you’ve seen that before right?). Here the bunny gazes up at the sky, perhaps dreaming of getting back home.

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