5500 Light Bulbs: An Interactive Sculpture Lets You Change The Phases of the Moon

The last time we covered artists Caitlind R.C. Brown and Wayne Garrett, they were encouraging people to control the weather with their interactive installation called CLOUD. This time they’re letting you take control of something even more difficult to grasp: the phases of the moon.

Built from 5500 burned out light bulbs donated by the community, the duo installed ‘New Moon’ in Lexington, Kentucky, last February. On the wooden platform beneath the four arches supporting the orb was an ornate turnstyle. When intrigued passerby gave it a spin, they changed the phases of the moon above. Surprising and delightful.

No-Frizz Flora and Fauna: Gorgeous Nature-Inspired Headdresses by Takaya

The models below are most certainly having a good hair day—with a little help from Japanese floral artist Takaya. Using fresh-cut blooms, berries, leaves, and even stuffed birds, Takaya crafts monumental wearable sculptures that are sure to turn heads.

Stunning Geometric Textures Carved Into Plywood Using a CNC Machine

Using the precise cutting head of a CNC machine, artist Michael Anderson carves incredibly beautiful geometric patterns and textures into pieces of plywood. Each pass of the machine reveals the layers of Anderson’s source material, adding contour lines that emphasize the ups and downs of each design.

Are They Breathing? Hyper-Realistic Sculptures of Warhol, Lincoln and Dali

Kyoto-based artist Kazuhiro Tsuji has been shocking people with his incredibly lifelike sculptures of famous people. His perfect bust of Abraham Lincoln looks so real you’d swear he traveled back to 1865 to capture a color photograph. The same goes for his likenesses of art legends Andy Warhol and Salvador Dali. While these sculptures may be new to you, you’ve probably seen Tsuji’s work before. He spent most of his career as a highly successful makeup artist in the film industry.

Landscapes Dominated by the World’s Largest Statues

Around the world, people have built massive statues to symbolize the religious and political icons of their particular region. There are the Buddhas in Japan, Mao Zedong in China and Jesus Christ in Indonesia. Photographer Fabrice Fouillet traveled around the world documenting the largest examples and how they affect the surrounding landscapes. He shares via his artistic statement:

Metal Figures Sculpted from Wire Fencing

Sculptor Edoardo Tresoldi is a bit of an alchemist. And while he may not be transforming base metals into gold itself, he does take normal industrial metal fencing and change it into something quite beautiful. Tresoldi delicately shapes the mesh into figures of the human form.

Reclaimed Wood Transformed into Immersive Geometric Installations

Using discarded housing materials as her medium, Australian-American artist Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels creates large-scale geometric installations that you can climb inside. Predominantly made from the wood lathe found in old plaster walls, her work plays with the uniform structures of a crystal, repeating layered triangles that link together into a human enveloping whole.

Amy Bennett Builds Miniature Worlds, Then Paints The Life of the People that Inhabit Them

If you’re wondering how artist Amy Bennett achieves the unusual appearance of her paintings, it’s because she has an incredibly unusual technique. Bennett creates expansive 3D models using cardboard, foam, wood, paint, glue, and model railroad miniatures, then photographs the tiny worlds and paints the results in oil on panel.

84-Year-Old Grandpa Welds a Death Star Fire Pit for Christmas

That’s no moon… it’s a fire pit. For Christmas this year, Redditor Jennifer Allison (aka Bandia5309) got a gift that would warm the heart of any Star Wars fan. Her 84-year-old grandpa, Kenneth, took the round ends off a propane tank, connected them to form a sphere and cut out just the right bits to turn it into a very toasty version of the Death Star… including that pesky ventilation shaft.

The Boxtrolls’ End Credits Shows How Much Work Goes Into Stop-Motion

A stop-motion movie might not be the typical platform for a philosophical discussion of determinism versus free will, but the end credits for The Boxtrolls handles it in very funny fashion. The short clip also highlights the massive amount of work that goes into creating a stop-motion film, showing a time-lapse animator repositioning each character a countless number of times to produce just this short sequence.

For an idea of how long this took, note the changes in the animators outfit as the days pass.

“It’s just too much…”