Glass Sculptures Look Like Splashing Waves Frozen in Motion

Living near the seaside town of Santa Cruz, California, glass artists Marsha Blaker and Paul DeSomma are in touch with the beauty of crashing surf. The two frequently collaborate on projects which echo the forms of the marine environment and its many textures, including these absolutely stunning wave sculptures. They look just like water frozen in motion.

Intricately Detailed, Hand Made Paper Birds Look Shockingly Realistic

Inspired by the natural world, London-based artist Zack Mclaughlin shows his child like wonder and attention to detail by reproducing the intricately detailed things he spots. His latest series is a collection of hand made birds that are cut from wood and paper and painted with acrylic paints. The birds look so realistic and beautiful that it’s hard to believe that they won’t fly away.

This Artist is Giving Plastic Bottles a New Life as Plant Sculptures

Using discarded plastic PET bottles, Czech artist Veronika Richterová creates fantastic translucent plant sculptures. Whether its an entire shelf of cactus’ or lillypads floating in a pond, each is a whimsical take on the natural world – one that protects it from being over-run with waste products.

The “Dr. Seuss House” Towers Over the Alaskan Forest

The locals call it the “Dr. Seuss House”. Far out in the wilds of Alaska, near the town of Willow, stands a tall building in the middle of the forest. It looks like it could have come from a fantasy novel or perhaps the pages of a book by the legendary Theodor Geisel, but the original builder isn’t around to tell the story.

Dots of Paint Transform Ordinary Stones into Beautiful Mandalas

Australian artist Elspeth McLean loves color and detail, infusing it into all her works, large and small. Using a painting style inspired by ancient and traditional art, one she describes as “Dotillism,” she uses acrylic paint and a paintbrush to create intricate patterns of intense colors. Here we bring you some of her smallest works – round ocean stones transformed into beautiful handfuls of art. She calls them ‘Mandala Stones.’

A Library & Public Art Space Built with 50,000 Free Books

Most libraries are filled with books, this one is made from them. Lacuna is a public art space for book lovers, built from 50,000 free books donated by the Internet Archive. Currently raising funds through Kickstarter, the crew behind the structure are planning to install it at the inaugural Bay Area Book Festival in Berkley, California on June 6 and 7. Books will be given away for free.

Wooden Wireframe Sculptures Recreate Everyday Objects

Most household items wouldn’t be considered beautiful, but when Polish artist Janusz Grünspek creates sculptures featuring many of them, they become something bigger than their everyday roots. His real-life wireframes take the form of cassette tapes, a coffee maker or an Apple laptop, all made with delicate precision with just wooden skewers and a hot glue gun. Wood isn’t something you usually associate with 3D modeling, but in this case it does the job wonderfully. His series is called “Drawings in Space” (Zeichnungen im Raum).

Sean Kenney Builds LEGO Sculptures Inspired by the Natural World

Sean Kenney has been using LEGOs for over a decade to make contemporary sculpture, and in the process he’s worked with millions of the tiny plastic bricks. His most recent work is featuring in his traveling exhibition Nature Connects, which includes 27 sculptures inspired by the web of life – from a small squirrel running along a fence, to a near-life sized bison that used 45,143 LEGO pieces and took 700 hours to complete.

Simple Paper Cylinders Form a Beautiful Sky-Gazing Experience

Sometimes the simplest of materials can create something of impressive beauty. For her graduating thesis project, Japanese art student Shoko Konishi created a structure made completely out of thick pieces of paper. From the outside it looks just fine, but climbing through the tiny door people are treated to an unusually spectacular view of the sky.

Bee Keeping Artist Creates A Beeswax World Map

If there’s one person who knows how to mind his own beeswax, it’s Chinese artist Ren Ri. The beekeeper/artist “manipulates the movement of bees and the formation of honeycombs to create metaphysical and hybrid sculptures, which investigate the force of nature and consequences of human intervention (Press Release).” In his latest body of work, Yuansu I: The Origin of Geometry, Ri sculpts honeycombs into the shapes of the continents, using wire and a wooden frame. He created a world map as well as some individual countries. He has been working with bees as a beekeeper since 2006 and began using beeswax as an art medium in more recent years.