Wooden Wireframe Sculptures Recreate Everyday Objects

Most household items wouldn’t be considered beautiful, but when Polish artist Janusz Grünspek creates sculptures featuring many of them, they become something bigger than their everyday roots. His real-life wireframes take the form of cassette tapes, a coffee maker or an Apple laptop, all made with delicate precision with just wooden skewers and a hot glue gun. Wood isn’t something you usually associate with 3D modeling, but in this case it does the job wonderfully. His series is called “Drawings in Space” (Zeichnungen im Raum).

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Sean Kenney Builds LEGO Sculptures Inspired by the Natural World

Sean Kenney has been using LEGOs for over a decade to make contemporary sculpture, and in the process he’s worked with millions of the tiny plastic bricks. His most recent work is featuring in his traveling exhibition Nature Connects, which includes 27 sculptures inspired by the web of life – from a small squirrel running along a fence, to a near-life sized bison that used 45,143 LEGO pieces and took 700 hours to complete.

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Simple Paper Cylinders Form a Beautiful Sky-Gazing Experience

Sometimes the simplest of materials can create something of impressive beauty. For her graduating thesis project, Japanese art student Shoko Konishi created a structure made completely out of thick pieces of paper. From the outside it looks just fine, but climbing through the tiny door people are treated to an unusually spectacular view of the sky.

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Bee Keeping Artist Creates A Beeswax World Map

If there’s one person who knows how to mind his own beeswax, it’s Chinese artist Ren Ri. The beekeeper/artist “manipulates the movement of bees and the formation of honeycombs to create metaphysical and hybrid sculptures, which investigate the force of nature and consequences of human intervention (Press Release).” In his latest body of work, Yuansu I: The Origin of Geometry, Ri sculpts honeycombs into the shapes of the continents, using wire and a wooden frame. He created a world map as well as some individual countries. He has been working with bees as a beekeeper since 2006 and began using beeswax as an art medium in more recent years.

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It’s Not Photoshop. These are Iconic Photographs Recreated as Miniature Models

When they aren’t creating high quality advertising photographs, Switzerland-based Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger have been building impeccably detailed models of iconic photographs. Viewed from the same angle as the original photograph, you would almost swear these were Photoshopped. Like so many good (and crazy) ideas, this one began with a bit of fun

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Hypnotic Geometry: Kinetic Sculptures by Jennifer Townley

Jennifer Townley’s sculptures would look impressive even if they were sitting still – but, each one moves. Her kinetic sculptures are driven by simple electric motors, and through a series of belts, cogs and shafts, they move in ways which are hypnotically complex.

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Willard Wigan Makes the Smallest Handmade Sculpture in History…In a Piece of Beard Stubble

Using a single hollowed out piece of his own beard stubble, microscopy artist Willard Wigan has created the world’s smallest sculpture. Under the microscope he turned a tiny flake of gold into a motorbike and inserted it into the 0.0035inch piece of stubble. With patience, dexterity, and extreme focus, Wigan has to hold his breath and make his movements between heartbeats. He challenges himself to make each fragile, miniature masterpieces more detailed and smaller than the previous ones. He has created several sculptures in the eye of a needle, but this beard stubble one gives a whole new meaning to the word tiny.

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Slinkachu’s “Miniaturesque”: More Miniature People Take Over the Urban World

London-based artist Slinkachu (featured previously) has been hard at work creating some of the smallest street art we’ve seen. That’s not to demean its importance (though you might just miss it walking down the street). His tiny miniatures have been cleverly installed all over the city and parklands of London, creating humorous and surprising scenes of tiny figurines interacting with the larger world.

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Geometric Sculptures Made From Thousands of Coins

Artist Robert Wechsler creates fascinatingly complex sculptures made from pocket change – a lot of it. We featured his piece Mendicant 26,982 previously, and his new works are equally interesting. Each groups coins together as if they were joined by molecular bonds, forming surprising geometry in their connections and the gaps they leave in between.

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Tiny Worlds Float on Gallery Walls. Sculptures by Cuban Artist Jorge Mayet

Cuban artist Jorge Mayet is creating his own miniature worlds. Attached to white walls, many of his sculptures seem to float in the sky, their bottom sides revealing raw soil and roots as if they have ripped free from all that is below. Other sculptures seem to explode in mid-air, their small wooden houses becoming a cloud of floating splinters. This is no destructive event, however, but one that makes things move and spread.

Like his floating islands, Jorge left Cuba 22 years ago to explore the world. He landed on another island, Palma de Mallorca, Spain. His work today draws inspiration from his homeland, creating a conversation about belonging and nostalgia for place.

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