Crystalline Patterns in Frozen Soap Bubbles

Who knew that blowing bubbles in sub-zero temperatures could create such beautiful crystalline patterns? Apparently photographer Cheryl Johnson did. She went out on cold days to capture the many possible ways each bubble would form its incredible display. Created by the water in between the soapy film layers, the freezing begins at the bottom and expands upwards until the bubble in entirely covered.

Share:

Optical Illusion Bags That Look Like They’ve Jumped Out of a Comic Book

If Roy Lichtenstein had been in the bag business, it might have gone a lot like this. Jump From Paper has been designing playful bags that look as if they leapt from the pages of a vintage comic book – and just like the paper those stories were printed on, these bags look completely flat. Don’t be fooled though: it’s a clever optical illusion created with thick black piping and chunky blocks of color.

Share:

Frozen Sand Sculpted by Strong Winds on Lake Michigan

Last week, photographer Joshua Nowicki was visiting St. Joseph on the shores of Lake Michigan when he spotted something very odd. Spread out on the beach were hundreds of small towers of sand, each about a foot tall. The tiny formations were created by a combination of freezing temperatures and very high winds (sometimes gusting to around 50 mph). Little by little the frozen sand eroded the beach around it, flowing like a river to form the beautiful canyon-like scene Nowicki captured with his camera.

Share:

A Former Monk is Building this Giant Cathedral from Junk. He’s Been Working 52 Years.

In 1963 Justo Gallego Martinez began construction on the foundation for a grand cathedral in Mejorada del Campo, just outside of Madrid. Though he started with no architecture or construction training, the former monk has spent almost every day building his dream. Now 52 years later, his building towers 131 feet into the sky, far above the apartment buildings that surround it.

Share:

A Wild Tour of Dubai, From Top to Bottom

Between its super-tall skyline, vast deserts, artificial palm-shaped islands, and its impressive wealth, Dubai is a place of extremes. It’s no surprise then, that award-winning filmmaker Rob Whitworth needed 3 months to explore, research and film the city and its surrounding lands for his latest video Dubai Flow Motion. It was time well spent.

Share:

Shanghai From A Crane Operator’s Perspective

It takes a fearless person to spend their working hours high in the sky, and to build skyscrapers we need these courageous ones. Wei Gensheng works as a crane operator and he has decided to share what Shanghai looks like from his perspective, nearly 2000 feet in the air! From high up in the crane cab, Gensheng shows that his eye for good photographs is just as good as his crane operating skills. This photograph series was taken while Gensheng was working on the construction of the Shanghai Tower.

Share:

A 3.5-Minute Music Video Shot in Just 5 Seconds (Using a High Speed Camera)

French filmmaker Guillaume Panariello claims he’s made the “shortest shoot ever” and that might just be true. Using just 5 seconds of actual time, he’s created a 3.5-minute video which packs in a ton zany action – from a fishing eskimo and boozing cupid, to WWII soldiers shooting confetti.

Share:

These Employees Are Having A Ball At Work

It’s all work and all play at the London creative agency Pearlfisher. In its forward-thinking installation called Jump In!, the agency filled its gallery space with over 81,000 white plastic balls to “promote the transformative power of play.”

Share:

Capturing Travel Memories With A Camera Was Too Easy, So Teresa Lim Decided to Embroider Them Instead

With cameras that fit in our pockets, stored in a digital form that allows us to have hundreds of thousands at a time, sometimes taking a photo takes us out of the moment in our attempt to preserve it. Teresa Lim has found a way to combat this predicament. Now she spends two hours soaking in the energy of each travel spot while she embroiders what most would snap a quick shot of. In her series called “Sew Wanderlust” she brings us around the world with her and photographs each finished stitch work with the background that inspired it.

Share:

Check Out What These Three Sisters Did to Liven Up Their Grandmother’s Town

It took the creative minds of three sisters to entirely transform an otherwise common town in Taiwan. Nobody really had a desire to visit the town of Huija, other than to attend one of the three temple gatherings each year. It didn’t help that drab grays and blues on old brick was the popular style there. But that’s different now.

While visiting their grandmother’s house on holiday, the three sisters decided to bring some life to the place. They got some supplies and painted the outside of her house with their favorite cartoon characters including Daruma Dolls, which are a symbol of luck in Japan. What happened next no one in the town could have expected.

Share: