World Renowned Pumpkin Carver Is Just As Talented At Sand Sculptures

Previously featured for the world’s largest pumpkin carving, Ray Villafane has sculpting talents in more than just the gourd field. Using wet, compressed sand, Villafane chips away to create larger than life characters and scenes. Although his first attempt at sand sculpting was only seven years ago (last featured image) it looked like he had been doing this for centuries. His second sand sculpture was the Dante’s Inferno piece and it came in the form of a 10 day challenge, but of course he delivered results that inspired awe in Jesolo, Italy.

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Cosmic Paintings From The Beautiful Mind of Lisete Alcade

In dreams, meditations, or vision quests, some people can see beyond the reality where most people dwell, but very few can reproduce those visions in a way that can be shared with others. Lisete Alcade is one of the exceptions. Painting with brushes, as well as her fingertips and the palms of her hands, she creates beautiful, detailed works with powerful themes.

Growing up in Mexico, with spiritual parents involved in alternative medicine practices, she was always encouraged to follow her heart. After a soul searching trip, when she was 19, Lisete realized that painting was her true passion in life. She has been focused on using her art to bring inspiration and awareness throughout the world ever since. Now 33, she lives in Brooklyn, New York where she has painted beautiful murals on buildings and contributed many works to the urban art scene.

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Downright Creepy Ceramics from Israeli Artist Ronit Baranga

Some people get nervous about eating unusual foods, but it’s not often anyone gets creeped out by their dinnerware. Israeli ceramicist Ronit Baranga creates the kind of work which can elicit exactly that reaction. Her works feature open mouths and grasping fingers jutting out of classic plates, tea cups and platters. It’s enough to make anyone think twice.

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Celebrity Portraits Painted with Emojis

Most people use a camera or a paint brush to make portraits, but not Yung Jake. This multi-talented artist uses something more often used to share enthusiastic and/or ambiguous emotions via text message. That’s right, emojis.

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Circular Paper Cut Scenes from Nermin Er

Turkish artist Nermin Er cuts circular silhouettes into flat sheets of paper, layering each spherical scene into cinematografic worlds with beautiful depth. Many of her works see the land wrap around the sky, forming a bright focal point that centers on the sun or moon above. How appropriate then, that many are built as light boxes which gently illuminate each sheet of paper.

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Drawing Mushrooms With Sound: A Must-See Oscilloscope Project For The Inquiring Mind

Remember in elementary school when you learned to create words on your upside down calculator? This is kinda like that only 1000 times cooler. Using an analog oscilloscope, Jerobeam Fenderson figured out how to draw a mushroom with sound. Not just any mushroom, a moving one, and then multiple mushrooms. Get your earphones (lower the volume), pop some popcorn, and click on the video below.

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Black and White Photos Wiped into Color

There’s probably no better way to see the power of the colorizing technique than with these animated GIFs from the Dutch design website NSMBL. Taking iconic images from around the web, they’ve overlaid colorized versions of the same image that is slowly revealed with a animated series of wipes. It’s like seeing each photograph wiped into reality.

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Can You Identify These 18 Everyday Objects Photographed Up Close?

Look around you and the world seems pretty familiar – but if you look close enough, things can start to look pretty alien. For the recent project Amazing Worlds Within Our World, multi-talented artist Pyanek created a series of macro photos that explore everyday objects up close, revealing their minute details while obscuring what makes them so recognizable.

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5500 Light Bulbs: An Interactive Sculpture Lets You Change The Phases of the Moon

The last time we covered artists Caitlind R.C. Brown and Wayne Garrett, they were encouraging people to control the weather with their interactive installation called CLOUD. This time they’re letting you take control of something even more difficult to grasp: the phases of the moon.

Built from 5500 burned out light bulbs donated by the community, the duo installed ‘New Moon’ in Lexington, Kentucky, last February. On the wooden platform beneath the four arches supporting the orb was an ornate turnstyle. When intrigued passerby gave it a spin, they changed the phases of the moon above. Surprising and delightful.

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Mike Wellins’ Bizarre Additions to Thrift Store Paintings

Mike Wellins’ has an obsession with the odd things of the world, and he creates plenty of them too. Co-creator of Portland’s one-and-only “freakybuttrue” Peculiarium, he has been raiding thrift stores, flea markets and garage sales to feed his appetite for old paintings. He then remixes them with strange additions – like rocket packs for bunnies, to hoards of zombies. It’s a process that’s been dubbed NERC (Non-elective Retroactive Collaboration).

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