Data + Design Project

A World Filled with Light and Love, Illustrated by Pascal Campion

Wednesday 11.19.2014 , Posted by
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Illustrator Pascal Campion has a big heart, and every one of his artworks shows it. That’s saying a lot too, because he’s amassed well over 3000 sketches since he started his Sketch of the Day project in 2006. At that point in his life he was short on time, but starting that challenging project has garnered him more exposure and fans (he calls them friends) than he could ever have expected. Just take a look at this small selection of his work and you’ll easily see why. [Read more…]

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Inside the Warrior: Photographer Highlights the Masculine Side of Yoga

Wednesday 11.19.2014 , Posted by
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While yoga classes in the US generally tend to have a high female to male ratio, there are increasingly more men embracing the practice. While there are some men there for the view of the women in Lululemon spandex, there are also true yogis who embody the warrior nature of the practice. With warm, open hearts and defined, masculine exteriors, these men are a source of inspiration. Photographer Amy Goalen has artistically captured these warriors in various poses to highlight and celebrate their strength. 15 of her photos make up the Yoga Men 2015 Calendar which would be the perfect holiday gift for your favorite yogi. [Read more…]

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Tales of Auto Elasticity: Hyper-Realistic Pickup Truck Renderings in Impossible Curves

Tuesday 11.18.2014 , Posted by
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3D artist Chris LaBrooy takes the form of classic pickup trucks and bends them to his will in his incredibly surreal images. Truck beds stretch into long curving loops, interlocking with other pickups in impossible looking assemblages. As much as these appear to be sculptures (…how amazing would they be?!), they are actually hyper-realistic digital renderings from his series Tales of Auto Elasticity. [Read more…]

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Touching Self-portraits Document the Psychological Journey of Grieving Death

Tuesday 11.18.2014 , Posted by
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After losing her fiancé in a helicopter crash in 2012, Sarah Treanor quit her job as a graphic designer to pursue a deeply emotional exploration of grief through photography. The creative endeavor is symbolic of her psychological experience in process and in imagery, and captures the essence of the dark, peaceful, and disorienting journey of mourning. The heart-wrenching feeling the images evoke is universally familiar and carefully dissects the most difficult aspect of the human experience – death. [Read more…]

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Dutch Artist Stretches the Skin in Unusual Ways (It’s Not Photoshop)

Tuesday 11.18.2014 , Posted by
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At first glance one would assume that these manipulations were done digitally, but they were not. In her latest photographic series, Dutch artist Juuke Schoorl explores the malleability of the human skin. Utilizing simple techniques to modify the shape and texture of her subject’s bodies, it’s interesting to see just how much the appearance of skin can change with the lightest of alterations. Her project, titled REK (“STRETCH” in Dutch), used materials as conventional as tape, nylon string and thin plastic rods to shape the subject before shooting. [Read more…]

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Nuala O’Donovan Sculpts Nature’s Fractals In Porcelain By Hand

Tuesday 11.18.2014 , Posted by
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Inspired by coral, pinecones, and flowers, Nuala O’Donovan is fascinated with irregular/fractal patterns in nature. The Irish artist has found a way to mimic the fractal phenomena that create some of the most gorgeous sights in the natural world. She creates a pattern of which each element is individually made and slowly builds a form, that can take weeks or months. The final porcelain piece is so intricately beautiful and fascinating that it’s hard to believe it was made by human hands. [Read more…]

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Thomas Richner Built a Millennium Falcon from a Basement Full of Cardboard Boxes

Monday 11.17.2014 , Posted by
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…in a basement far, far away (well actually Columbus, Ohio), animation artist Thomas Richner had a big mess of boxes to clean up. He had two options: recycle them responsibly, or build a 5 foot long model of the Millennium Falcon. We’re sure glad they didn’t go to waste.

One hundred and forty hours later (and a whole lot of glue) the Star Wars model is complete, and so realistic it almost looks like a still from the movie when filmed in front of a green screen. Let’s take a trip through Richner’s process from humble start to hyperdrive finish. [Read more…]

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Shane Hope Creates 3D Printed Art from Biological Molecular Models

Monday 11.17.2014 , Posted by
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What do get when you put molecular models and DNA structures into 3D visualization software and then bring it to life with homemade 3D printers? The artwork of Shane Hope. Drawing from information in protein data bank files, he creates complex collage-like visualizations and subsequently prints them to create complex and colorful arrangements. Or as Hope tells Wired “To fractalize aminos off forms to perform generative crystallography, code for crazy carbon chaining.” [Read more…]

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Art That Takes You Places: Metro Stations in Naples are Becoming Art Galleries

Monday 11.17.2014 , Posted by
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Ten years ago the city of Naples, Italy, decided to renew their subway stations with a bit of art and life. Under the guidance of Achille Bonto Oliva, the former Venice Biennale director, 14 stations have been redesigned, and now house over 200 works by over 100 artists and architects. Each station has its own signature style. [Read more…]

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You Don’t Have To Eat Gluten To Enjoy These Bread Lamps

Saturday 11.15.2014 , Posted by
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In today’s increasingly gluten free world, bread is getting a bad rap. But whether or not you can tolerate gluten, you can allow these bread lamps to illuminate your home. Japanese designer and foodie, Yukiko Morita has created lamps out of real loaves of bread. Aside from the basic flour, salt, and yeast, her loaves also have an LED light and batteries inside.

The 27 year old artist calls her line Pampshade which combines the Japanese word for bread (Pan) with lamp shade. She got the idea for Pampshade lights when she was working at a small bakery in Kyoto and noticed the way sunlight shone through a hollowed out French baguette. After trial and error with over 300 prototypes using the leftovers from the bakery each day, she discovered that hollowing out the bread and drying the shell in the oven gives the best results. She coats the baked shell in resin and inserts the light bulb. [Read more…]

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