This Incredible Artist Doesn’t Let Cerebral Palsy Stand In His Way

Although holding a pencil steady was not an option for Paul Smith, he found a way to create beautiful dimensional drawings using a typewriter. The incredible typewriter artist, who lived with cerebral palsy for 85 years, didn’t let his lack of coordination, speech problems, and difficulties with mobility keep him from expressing himself. Holding his right hand steady with his left, he used the symbols on the numbers with a clamped shift key to create his beautiful pictures. Paul Smith was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and passed away in Roseburg, Oregon 7 years ago, but his legacy lives on and continues to inspire people all over the world.

Crumbling Soviet-Era Architecture from a Photographer Accused of Espionage

It’s not every day people go urban exploring in Russia, but English photographer Rebecca Litchfield did it. Over 10 trips into previously Soviet regions she ducked behind fences, risked radiation exposure, was arrested, interrogated and even accused of espionage – all in the name of documenting the relics of the fallen Soviet Union. Her collection of images and the book she recently published are titled Soviet Ghosts.

Intricate Quilled Paper Illustrations from Yulia Brodskaya

Talented Russian artist Yulia Brodskaya continues to experiment with her illustrative quilling style. Since we covered her work previously, she has continued to explore portraits of the aged, using her curled paper to portray the deeply creased faces of the older generations (it’s a surprisingly good fit). Her latest work doesn’t stick to the page either – many elements climb out of the scene in sculptural 3D.

Exquisite Illustrations Blend Biology and Technology

Seattle-based artist and textile designer Olivia Knapp creates exquisite illustrations influenced by European line engravings from the 16th to 18th centuries. But, unlike the scientific drawings that inspired them, the work includes choice examples of modern technology amongst her surrealistically rendered biological features.

Patagonia Wants You To “Vote The Environment”

Is voting on your calendar? This October and November mark primary and mid-term elections seasons, and according to a recent poll by Harvard University, only 23% of young people “definitely plan” to vote.

Get Lost In The Never-Ending Details Of A Joshua Mays Mural

In the next couple of months, a few of Oakland’s buildings will be getting a beautiful face lift. Talented painter, artist, and muralist Joshua Mays will be working on a series of 4 murals which he calls BEACON and hopes to finish by October 1st, 2014. In his signature dreamlike style, with soft colors, rich details, and luscious layers ripe with feminine energy, Mays will transform old buildings into conversation pieces. From his drawings to his paintings and especially his murals, there is so much to see that even after 10 minutes of deep stares, you can still discover new things. Mays also has murals up in Philadelphia, Denver, Washington D.C., Portland, and Mexico City.

California: A Time-Lapse Captures the Many Colors of the Golden State

It’s no secret that we are major fans of our home state, California, and this new time-lapse from Hal Bergman shows many of the reasons why. Bergman, a fellow native of the Golden State, spent 4 years shooting the Vimeo Staff Picked video, often spending 1-3 hours at each location (and sometimes up to 24) to create the final 67 clips that made this final cut. He visits both out of the way places like Joshua Tree and Death Valley, and familiar spots like San Francisco and Yosemite. Watch and enjoy.

Flower Eyes Gaze Out of the Canvas

Take a peek at Italian artist Beniamino Leone’s fantastic series ‘Fioriture.’ Here, women’s faces peer out of his large canvas’ with floral eyes that lend them a truly surreal visage. I haven’t decided yet if these are beautiful or unnerving, but somewhere in between is perfect too.

OsGemeos Transform Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants

Renowned Brazilian street artist twins, OsGemeos have lent their signature ‘Giants’ to a series of six huge silos for the Vancouver Biennale. Located on Granville Island, the 70-foot tall towers perfectly match the duo’s work, even including small legs at the bottom.

More Famous Movie Stills in Real-Life

Film buff Christopher Moloney has a knack for tracking down famous film locations. When we featured his work before, he was taking screenshots he printed out and matching them up with their real-life location. We’re happy he hasn’t stopped – and now he’s trimming off the white border on his prints to create a seamless fit into the actual location (which surely takes a steady hand).