NASA Filmed the Sun For 5 Years And Squeezed It Down Into This 3 Minute Time-lapse

To celebrate the fifth anniversary of their Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) yesterday,NASA released this comprehensive time-lapse of our amazing sun. Although it spans 5 years of footage, with one frame captured every 8 hours, they condensed the spinning star dance into 3 minutes. According to NASA, “The different colors represent the various wavelengths (sometimes blended, sometimes alone) in which SDO observes the sun.” And the best part about this video is that you can stare at the sun, at a range you could never see it in real life, without even damaging your vision!

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16th Century ‘Prayer Nuts’ Hide Miniature Carvings

If you were wealthy and devout in 16th century Europe, one of the ultimate possessions was a prayer nut. These tiny wooden spheres were intricately carved boxes filled with religious scenes like the Crucifixion. Worn around the neck attached to a rosary or on the owners belt, it has been theorized that the outer carvings were inserted with aromatic plants and oils to add to the experience of owning one.

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There’s an “International Car Church” in Nevada

Deep in the middle of Nevada there’s a church. This isn’t your everyday church though. In fact, it’s full of Cadillacs, Buicks and Dodges. Welcome to the International Car Forest of the Last Church, located in the old mining town of Goldfield. Created by Mark Ripple and artist Chad Sorg, the “car forest” boasts more than 40 vehicles of all shapes and sizes. Many are buried nose first in the desert.

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Bizarre Sculptures Rotate The Face 360 Degrees

Italian artist Gianluca Traina creates bizarre sculptures with the form of the human head. The image of the face, however, is rotated far off center. Her series, entitled “Portrait 360” uses a combination of 2D and 3D work to realize sculpture that is difficult to clearly identify – but that’s just the point.

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Before Business Cards: Trade Card Designs From the Victorian Era

Between 1870 and 1890, the most common and visible way to spread word about your business was through the form of “trade cards,” the predecessor to the modern business card. America shops would give them out after the sale of a product, and in turn, people would collect them and paste them in their scrapbooks. The most advertised cards in those days included medicine, food, tobacco, clothing, household and sewing items, stoves and farm supplies.

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Retrowave: A Stunning 80s Animation Combines ‘Tron’ with ‘Back to the Future’

It’s part Back to the Future vehicles, part Tron surrealism. German animator Florian Renner has produced a overload of ‘80s goodness with his latest short, called Retrowave. The neon wrapped buildings of his futuristic city are seen through a greased lens. And down on the streets a time-traveling Delorean races through 88 mph and time itself. It’s a fitting vision for this 30th anniversary of the now legendary film.

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Abandoned Spaces Across Europe, Seen Through the Lens of Romain Veillon

For as long he can remember, photographer Romain Veillon has been fascinated with abandoned places. In his childhood, he sought out those mysterious and quiet spots, eventually deciding to bring a camera along to document his adventures. As his talent for photography grew, so did his ability to capture the spirit of the abandoned places he was shooting. His photographs have a way of transcending time – each displays the past, present and maybe even the future of the space.

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Made in One Piece: 3D Printed Guitars With Moving Parts

If you’re looking for a truly unique guitar, look no further than these 3D printed axes from ODD Guitars. The Swedish company has been turning out fully-customizable guitar bodies for the last few years that take advantage of 3D printing tech and its ability to create highly detailed structures difficult or impossible to create with other methods. Take their American Graffiti guitar, above. Hidden inside the guitar’s latticework of flames are miniature tributes to the classic George Lucas film: hot rods, a jukebox, Mel’s Diner and even a set of moving dice.

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Coffee Stains Become Motorcycle Wheels in Illustrations by Carter Asmann

In just one image, illustrator and photographer Carter Asmann reveals three passions in his life: motorcycles, drawing, and coffee. In each example, the messy round stains stamped by a coffee mug transform into the wheels of a motorcycle – with the form of some stains even making these classic rides appear to be speeding. In contrast to their sloppy wheels, each motorcycle is rendered in beautiful perfection. His illustrations are as addictive as the caffeine that fueled them.

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Post-It People: Erik RVA Has Created Thousands of StickyHeadz Characters

I think it’s pretty unanimous that Post-Its are one of the greatest things on Earth and illustrator Erik RVA couldn’t agree more. He has been drawing funny faces on post-it’s on the daily for quite some time. He uploads his daily doodles to his Tumblr called StickyHeadz. Aside from the doodles, he often shows the background which inspired each face behind it, with clever commentary below.

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