This is What an Animation Looks Like if You 3D Print Each Frame.

3D animation is pretty normal, but taking every frame from your animation and making it tangible with a 3D printer is pretty different. That’s what the crew at Job, Joris & Marieke did with their latest animation “FREEZE!” Using all 100 frames from their looping CGI creation they’ve recreated an entire digital event in one frozen sculpture

Share:

These Employees Are Having A Ball At Work

It’s all work and all play at the London creative agency Pearlfisher. In its forward-thinking installation called Jump In!, the agency filled its gallery space with over 81,000 white plastic balls to “promote the transformative power of play.”

Share:

Check Out What These Three Sisters Did to Liven Up Their Grandmother’s Town

It took the creative minds of three sisters to entirely transform an otherwise common town in Taiwan. Nobody really had a desire to visit the town of Huija, other than to attend one of the three temple gatherings each year. It didn’t help that drab grays and blues on old brick was the popular style there. But that’s different now.

While visiting their grandmother’s house on holiday, the three sisters decided to bring some life to the place. They got some supplies and painted the outside of her house with their favorite cartoon characters including Daruma Dolls, which are a symbol of luck in Japan. What happened next no one in the town could have expected.

Share:

There’s an “International Car Church” in Nevada

Deep in the middle of Nevada there’s a church. This isn’t your everyday church though. In fact, it’s full of Cadillacs, Buicks and Dodges. Welcome to the International Car Forest of the Last Church, located in the old mining town of Goldfield. Created by Mark Ripple and artist Chad Sorg, the “car forest” boasts more than 40 vehicles of all shapes and sizes. Many are buried nose first in the desert.

Share:

5500 Light Bulbs: An Interactive Sculpture Lets You Change The Phases of the Moon

The last time we covered artists Caitlind R.C. Brown and Wayne Garrett, they were encouraging people to control the weather with their interactive installation called CLOUD. This time they’re letting you take control of something even more difficult to grasp: the phases of the moon.

Built from 5500 burned out light bulbs donated by the community, the duo installed ‘New Moon’ in Lexington, Kentucky, last February. On the wooden platform beneath the four arches supporting the orb was an ornate turnstyle. When intrigued passerby gave it a spin, they changed the phases of the moon above. Surprising and delightful.

Share:

Mexican Restaurant with 10,000 Animal Bones for Decor

If bones are your thing, then you need to get down to Guadalajara and check out ‘Hueso’, the classy new restaurant that features over 10,000 different bones adorning its walls. Hueso (which translates to Bone in Spanish) is the brain child of Mexican architect Ignacio Cadena.

Share:

Metal Figures Sculpted from Wire Fencing

Sculptor Edoardo Tresoldi is a bit of an alchemist. And while he may not be transforming base metals into gold itself, he does take normal industrial metal fencing and change it into something quite beautiful. Tresoldi delicately shapes the mesh into figures of the human form.

Share:

Digital Enlightenment? The Act of Levitation Through Brainwave Sensing Technology

Is the act of levitation possible? Whether it is the Tibetan monks high in the Himalayas or magicians in glitzy Las Vegas, some have claimed it is possible. Yet, one acclaimed artist has actually achieved levitation… that is, with a little help from his hacked toy brainwave sensor. Through the use of the sensor, some electronics and powerful actuators, artist John Slepian literally lifts himself from the ground and maybe that much closer to enlightenment.

Share:

Reclaimed Wood Transformed into Immersive Geometric Installations

Using discarded housing materials as her medium, Australian-American artist Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels creates large-scale geometric installations that you can climb inside. Predominantly made from the wood lathe found in old plaster walls, her work plays with the uniform structures of a crystal, repeating layered triangles that link together into a human enveloping whole.

Share:

A Ghost Ship Spotted Along A Canal in Amsterdam

We’ve seen plenty of ghost ships in movies, but this one doesn’t require animation. This vessel appears at night along a canal in Amsterdam and you won’t believe your eyes. Using stage lights and water curtains, the ship appears in the water and the wind only adds to its eerie qualities. Created by visualSKIN for the Amsterdam Light Festival, the apparition shows up in front of Amsterdam Center for Architecture and The National Maritime Museum.

Share: