Jim Bachor Fills the World’s Potholes with Very Sweet Mosaics

We’ve seen attention brought to potholes by filing them with surprises like an ice bucket of beer or a wild Barbie pool party – but what about actually fixing the problem? Chicago artist Jim Bachor has been doing that in a highly unusual and clever way, filling the tire-popping road craters with beautiful and surprising mosaics made from glass and marble. See? Create art, save the world (or at least a few tires).

Take an Immersive Journey Through These Luminous String-Art Installations

When we last featured French artist Julien Salaud he was creating ‘Stellar Animals’ – beautifully bizarre busts of deer covered in nails and thread. Now he is continuing his cosmic exploration with expansive rooms wrapped in luminous webs of constellation like thread art. He calls them ‘Stellar Caves.’

A Kinetic Light Installation Dances on the Ceiling of St. Petersburg’s Leningrad Center

St. Petersburg’s historic Leningrad Center has a new and luminous ceiling for its main theater. Above the audience is a matrix of dancing multi-color LED lightbulbs hanging from nearly invisible cords that whisk them up and down in mesmerizing patterns. One moment the field of lights look like gently flowing waves and the next they form a geometric pyramid – each new form is made with smooth and precisely choreographed transitions.

The only problem here? People might be so captivated by the lights that they miss the show itself.

Art Created with Beach Trash Washed Up at Mexico’s Sian Ka’an Reserve

Even the “untouched” areas of the world aren’t free from the effects of human created pollution. Artist Alejandro Duran makes that point clear through his color sorted collections of beach trash that washes up along the coastline of Mexico’s largest federally-protected reserve, Sian Ka’an. Duran’s site-specific installations highlight the situation with aesthetically beautiful organization – the problem of ocean-borne garbage is transformed into surreal forms which both contrast and merge with the natural environment. He calls his series Washed Up.

Photographer Builds A Set On the Streets of Brooklyn Which Is The Perfect Spot for a Romantic Proposal

Known for his Set in the Street project which involved placing indoor room sets around the sidewalks of New York City for interesting public interaction, Justin Bettman knows how to bring surprising randomness to the daily grind. This time his skills were sought out for something a little more romantic. Jose Luis, a man in love, saw Bettman’s project in New York Magazine and a light bulb went off that this was what he needed to propose to his girlfriend. So he sent a hopeful email to Bettman to see what he could do. Bettman tells Petapixel, “Of course I was going to build a set for this guy to propose on.”

Bringing the Forest into the Heart of New York’s Times Square

There is an exciting campaign on Kickstarter that has already met its initial goal and is close to meeting its stretch goal. Conservation biologist Marielle Anzelone loves the nature found in Manhattan and wants to help New Yorkers realize the valuable green space found throughout the city, so she has started a project to bring a lush green forest right into the heart of Times Square in NYC. 

A Library & Public Art Space Built with 50,000 Free Books

Most libraries are filled with books, this one is made from them. Lacuna is a public art space for book lovers, built from 50,000 free books donated by the Internet Archive. Currently raising funds through Kickstarter, the crew behind the structure are planning to install it at the inaugural Bay Area Book Festival in Berkley, California on June 6 and 7. Books will be given away for free.

The World’s Largest Candy Carpet Is So Sweet

Forget Halloween, kids! Go to streets of Chengdu, China, to get your sugar fix from the world’s largest candy carpet. “Sweet as One,” a unique edible installation designed by Craig & Karl and curated by Hong Kong creative studio AllRightsReserved, featured more than 13 tons of candy arranged into a beautiful tapestry. Assembled meticulously by 2,000 volunteers over the course of five days, the colorful candy carpet measured 607 ft-by-23 ft (185mX7m) and weighed in at more than 13 tons.

The piece was created to raise awareness to underprivileged children in the rural areas of China and celebrate Chinese New Year in a unique way. Now that’s freaking sweet.

Simple Paper Cylinders Form a Beautiful Sky-Gazing Experience

Sometimes the simplest of materials can create something of impressive beauty. For her graduating thesis project, Japanese art student Shoko Konishi created a structure made completely out of thick pieces of paper. From the outside it looks just fine, but climbing through the tiny door people are treated to an unusually spectacular view of the sky.

Slinkachu’s “Miniaturesque”: More Miniature People Take Over the Urban World

London-based artist Slinkachu (featured previously) has been hard at work creating some of the smallest street art we’ve seen. That’s not to demean its importance (though you might just miss it walking down the street). His tiny miniatures have been cleverly installed all over the city and parklands of London, creating humorous and surprising scenes of tiny figurines interacting with the larger world.