Hyperrealistic Stone Sculptures of Everyday Objects

Traditionally hyperrealism is done with oil paint. Shiny cans, shoes, fruit, junk food, etc. that look like they could be held in your hand are painted on a 2D canvas. But Robin Antar just took hyperrealism up a notch. He has been working with stone for nearly 40 years and has found a way to replicate everyday objects in STONE! For his series, Realism in Stone, he carves the stone into the shapes of condiment bottles, cookies, paper bags, toothpaste, and other things then paints them to look just like real life!

HULA Paints in Abondoned Places from the Side of His Paddleboard

Hawaiian artist and surfer Sean Yoro (aka HULA) has been living in New York. What to do when there are no waves around? He’s been grabbing his paddleboard and using it to access hard to reach places and paint. Yoro has a talent for painting beautiful women, and recently they have been finding their way to the walls of abandoned, water filled places. Their bodies seem to emerge from the quiet waters below.

Daniel Rozin’s ‘PomPom Mirror’ Reflects Your Body In Pixelated Fur

You don’t need glass to make a mirror. Artist Daniel Rozin has created one that reflects objects in faux fur. It’s entirely bizarre and almost magical.

Star Wars Portraits Made from 10,000s of Staples

Artist James Haggerty creates mosaics from a very unconventional material: LOTS of staples. His only tools in the process are a regular office stapler and the all important staple puller to correct mistakes. His work transforms the ubiquitous office supply into fine artworks with striking accuracy and realistic shading. For his most recent portraits he’s created works featuring 3 characters from the first Star Wars trilogy: C-3PO, Greedo and two versions of Darth Vader.

Anish Kapoor Creates an Ominous Whirlpool That Never Stops Draining

In the center of the old wooden floor of this former movie theater turned art space in San Gimignano, Italy, a dark pool of water spins in a perpetual whirlpool. Frothing like a raging sea, the unnerving sight drains into the floor and out of sight, lending viewers an uneasy feeling about what could be “down there.” The piece, called Decension, is the latest from British/Indian artist and designer Anish Kapoor, and follows on another in the series installed earlier this year at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India.

Birds Eye View Of Massive Cruise Ships

Who doesn’t love cruising through the ocean with all you can eat buffets and activities galore? Well I suppose those with motion sickness, Titanic-induced PTSD, or a number of other situations, however- most people love a good cruise. Like a super hotel on the ocean, cruise ships have casinos, ballrooms, multiple pools, rock climbing walls, and anything you can dream of. To see the magnitude of their size from a little dingy or a dock is humbling, but from this vantage point, cruise ships don’t look so intimidating. Photographer Jeffrey Milstein shot these ocean liners from an aerial view, which makes them look more like a computer part than a massive water vessel.

Classic Art Figures Immersed In Modern Day Backgrounds

In classic art, angels with instruments are everywhere, men wear ruffled attire and furs, and curvy women sit around in flowy layers and proper dresses. Those aren’t typical sites in modern day life, but Ukranian artist Alexey Kondakov thought it would be interesting if they did. In his ongoing series, “Art History in Contemporary Life”, Alexey Kondakov places figures from classic art pieces in present day settings and the contrast is quite interesting.

Pneumàtic: Tire Sculptures Seem to Dissolve Into the Sidewalk

Artists Octavi Serra, Iago Buceta, and Mateu Targa have collaborated on a series of sculptures featuring salvaged car tires that seem to disappear into walls and sidewalks. The trio of artists have made works that play with our mind and our understanding that tires are hugely tough. It makes it almost impossible to comprehend that these aren’t actually sinking into the concrete or brickwork on the streets they inhabit.

In fact, to create each piece, the artists used grinding tools to slice the tire, then placed it back in its natural urban environment to amuse.

HOT TEA Invites You to Swim Surrounded by Fields of Color

Minnesota-based street artist HOT TEA has a thing for rainbows. When we last covered his work, he’d yarn bombed the walkway on New York’s Williamsburg Bridge. Now he’s been tasked with bringing new life to the swimming pool on Roosevelt Island, but instead of using his normal yarn, he’s (thankfully) transformed the space with incredibly bright gradients of paint. 120 gallons to be exact.

Delicate Leaves Transformed Into Beautiful Bowls

It’s hard to create things more beautiful than the things nature creates on its own. The radiance and uniqueness of gorgeous flowers. The twisting branches of a tree. The intricate veins of a leaf. Every feature helping the organism to survive, yet unbelievably gorgeous to the eye. The veins of a leaf, remarkably similar to the veins that run through our bodies, allowing the life force of oxygen to be delivered to every cell. Japanese American artist Kay Sekimachi uses the natural beauty of tree leaves to create stunning bowls that so delicately remind us of the elegance that surrounds us in nature. With Japannese paper, Krylon coating, and water color, she gives the fragile leaves strength.