A Man is Illustrating All 100k Items in His Late Grandfather’s Tool Shed

Artist Lee John Phillips is in the midst of an impressive undertaking. The resident of Narberth (Arberth), Wales is illustrating every single object in his late grandfather’s toolshed. That amounts to over 100,000 items—every nut, bolt, washer and old hammer. Phillips estimates the project will take about 5 years.

How to Optimize Your Blog for Content Distribution

Good content is great to have, but it doesn’t mean much if no one sees it. You’re putting in all the work; you want all the shares, media pickup, and unique visitors you can get. If you’re running a blog, are you sure it’s optimized for distribution? Even in this modern Web-publishing era, too many blogs are woefully behind the times: broken social counters, no CTAS, the list goes on. To make sure you’re publishing the right way, check out these tips to optimize your blog for content distribution. And if you want more info on getting more eyes on your stuff, download Column Five’s free e-book, The Ultimate Guide to Content Distribution.

This Artist Rented Two Digital Billboards, Then Made Them Look Like They Weren’t There

Over the past month two digital billboards along Massachusetts’ interstate freeways have been blending into their surroundings. During the day, the large electronic screens show images of the lush woodland forest that surrounds them. By night, they light up with high definition images of the moon and magnificent starscapes. If it wasn’t for the recognizable rectangular billboard frame, you could almost miss them.

4 Reasons Vertical Video is Suddenly OK

Despite our title for this post, most people would agree: vertical video is the bane of the smart phone era. Our eyes aren’t stacked on top of each other, making a portrait shaped image less than natural viewing. They don’t fit on standard TV or laptop screens, leaving huge black bars at the border. Heck, Google’s Android camera app even scolds you for trying to go vertical. And we can’t forget about the scourge of “vertical video syndrome”

Elias Poland Drew Everything He Bought for a Year

Elias Poland spent his 22nd year recording life in a journal, but unlike most people, he didn’t stick to written accounts of the day, love interests or introspection on the meaning of life (although there’s some of that). Feeling he hadn’t been drawing enough, Elias hit on an idea that would encourage creative output: he’d draw a picture of everything he bought for the whole year.

“From coffee to scabies medication, I drew everything.”

Home in on 4 Centuries of American House Architecture

America has had a long and storied history when it comes to where we call “home”. From the European inspired architecture of the 17th century, to 19th century Craftsman homes, or the “McMansions” of the ‘90s the continual evolution of American house design speaks to our roots and our vision for the future. Pop Chart Lab recently released a print on this theme, The Architecture of American Houses, which sorts over 4 centuries of architecture into 7 major categories (from Colonial to Neo-Eclectic), and 40 subdivisions. It’s fantastically rich on details.

This Interactive Music Video Gives You the Golden Touch

Sometimes it’s the simplest ideas that we love the most. Masashi Kawamura of creative lab PARTY (featured previously) teamed up with Logan director Kenji Yamashita to create a music video with a touch screen experience that’s charmingly retro… and by that, we mean touching the screen doesn’t do anything at all

These Quirky ‘Combophotos’ Reveal Surprising Views of the World

From top to bottom, this photo series is very clever. Combophotos, a personal project by Creative Director Stephen McMennamy of BBDO Atlanta, pairs two images in delightfully unexpected ways. Each is sliced horizontally, and combined with a complimentary image: turtles grow helmets in place of shells, people take drinks out of water towers, and a milk jug pours white rope.

5 Minimalist Animations that Convey Big Ideas

When we peel away the layers of complexity in a project, we are left with only with the message at its core. That’s one of the BIG reasons why minimalist projects can have a huge impact. Do them right, and they’re brilliant, but do them wrong, and they’re just boring. Here we highlight 5 animation projects that nailed the delicate balancing act of detail vs. simplicity and convey so very much with very little.

This Artist Makes Food Spills into Tasty Artworks

Instead of using paint or ink, artist Giulia Bernardelli transforms foods like chocolate and coffee into beautiful artworks spilled across the page. The Italian artist (who goes by Bernulia on Instagram) works completely from instinct, using the inspiration that springs to mind while having a meal or drinking a coffee.