Still Wondering What To Be For Halloween? Here’s a Cheap, Eco-Friendly, DIY Solution

Trick or treat! Halloween is just around the corner, but do you really want to buy a mass manufactured costume and look like everyone else? You don’t have to. You can make your own mask this year with templates by designer Steve Wintercroft. The awesome geometric designs are like nothing we’ve seen on the shelves of Halloween Express. Classy and refined, like a dog in a tuxedo, these masks are sure to turn heads on Halloween. You get the satisfaction of making your own costume with a fool-proof template that won’t allow you to look like you made your own costume. Although Wintercroft is based in the UK, with an instant digital download, you could cross Halloween costume off of your checklist today! Then rest easy knowing that your costume was not made in a sweatshop and it’s 100% recyclable.

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Pancakes of The Apes: Eat Primates For Breakfast (Cruelty Free)

Awesome dad Nathan Shields of Saipancakes is at it again with his flipping amazing pancake creations. This time he pays an homage to our primate ancestors. Using hot chocolate mix, he mixed up 3 shades of pancake batter and used them to create portraits of a chimpanzee, bonobo, gibbon, gorilla, orangutan, and siamang. He shares his process in the timelapse video below.

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As If Knitting With Yarn Weren’t Hard Enough, Carol Milne Knits With Glass

I can’t think of cooler sculptures to give to a knitting aficionado, or anyone for that matter. Carol Milne does the unthinkable as she creates these fragile pieces that look like knitted glass. A long and complicated process that she created herself in 2006, Milne begins with a wax model, which is then surrounded by a refractory mold material (that can hold up in high temperatures). After the mold sets, she steams the wax out of the mold and replaces it with chunks of room temperature glass. The piece is then placed in a kiln and heated to 1400- 1600 degrees Fahrenheit, which melts the glass into the grooves formerly occupied by the wax. The glass is slowly cooled (can take weeks) to prevent cracking. When it is finished annealing, the mold is carefully picked away and voila!

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Why Didn’t I Think Of That? The Refrigerator Bottle Loft Is Pure Genius

If you, like most people, have ever struggled with finding space in your fridge to cool your beer, then you are going to want to hug Brian Conti of Strong Like Bull Magnets, the genius behind Bottle Loft. Now bottles, jars, and anything with metal lids do not have to waste space in your fridge. With super strong magnets, you can free up that wasted space above your short items so that you can still place other things below. No more taking everything out or shoving the bottles in whatever random crevices you can find. No more filling the veggie drawer with beers. Everything can fit just perfectly and it’s an organizer’s dream come true.

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A Film Without Film: Behold The Magic of 3D Printing Animation

Who says you need film to make a film? A French artist named Julien Maire has combined the modern technology of 3D printing with the classic art of animation to create unique light motion on a wall. The final result, composed of 85 miniature figurines in various micro-movement poses, looks like a motion picture of a man digging a hole. Like a flashy, crackly, silent film reel from the early 1900s, the project uses new ideas to create something old school.

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Check Out The Netherlands Through These Gigantic Eyes

In the city of ‘s-Hertogenbosch in The Netherlands, there is a new art installation that allows you to see the city from someone else’s eyes. You will literally sit inside of a giant eye and scope out the lovely city from up high on the side of a building. If you are over 16, weigh less than 264 lbs, buy a ticket for $14.50, and happen to be in this city from now until early November, then you’d be silly to miss this theatrical installation. Pascal Leboucq is the genius behind this project which he calls EYE. Directed by Lucas DeMan, there are 5 different eyes around the city and each offers a different perspective.

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Single Stranded Wire Twisted By Hand Into Beautiful Tree Sculptures

With the length of almost 4 football fields (378 yards) in wire, sculptor Clive Maddison created the beautiful tree above. This particular model has over 17,000 loops in the canopy, and it is mounted on a piece of Sweet Chestnut. As with all of his tree models, there is no glue or solder involved. The sculptures stay put solely from the twists of each strand, making each one unique. Starting from the base, which is often a piece of wood that matches the type of tree he will be sculpting, Maddison twists his way up from roots to trunk to branches to leaves.

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Mini Monet: A Little 5 Year Old Girl With Autism Is A Painting Prodigy

While autism impairs an individual’s ability to interact and communicate with others, it doesn’t always stop one from expressing him/herself. In the UK, there is a 5 year old autistic girl named Iris Grace, who is behind her peers in talking, but beyond many adults when it comes to painting. Many people have compared her style to that of Monet and she has already sold some of her work to art collectors all over the world for thousands of dollars!

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Painting With The Earth: A Large-Scale Mural Made of Mud

After 2 weeks of labor, Japanese artist and painter Yusuke Asai has completed a stunning mural that looks as though it was created with a large palette of brown paints, but in actuality he used 27 different types of soil. Since he was commissioned to do this work in Houston, Texas, Asai used dirt that was local to the area. He was expecting to have 10 different shades, but was pleasantly surprised with the 17 bonus soils, collected by students and volunteers, which included shades of red, green, and yellow. Although Asai has been doing this work since 2008, he has never worked with so many shades. He calls this piece “yamatane”, which is Japanese for “mountain seed”. Surprisingly, the only art training that Asai has had was a ceramics class in high school. When he realized he could not afford art school at a university, he studied folk and tribal art on his own at zoos and museums, and perfected his own techniques.

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J.R.R. Tolkien’s Art Is Right Up There With His Storytelling

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” – J.R.R. Tolkien An album of Tolkien’s lesser known art was released on Reddit by user ethan_kahn. Featuring pencil sketches and colored illustrations, some of the images were actually the covers on vintage editions of Tolkien’s books.

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