Nope, These Glitchy Portraits Aren’t Digital. They’re Hand Painted.

In a world that is becoming more dependent on technology, one has to ponder the impact on society. What are the tradeoffs to our personal freedoms and autonomy? Are we just codes that can be reduced or multiplied? This is a question that artist Justin Bower reflects upon and incorporates into his eclectic portraiture. At first glance one might believe that the art is created digitally, but there were no electronics involved – these works are entirely hand painted.

Building an Innovative Maker Space in Post-Disaster Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan tore a path of destruction 100 miles wide through the Philippines last November, affecting 14 million people and displacing 5 million. Almost a year later, the people of the Philippines are still recovering from the massive disaster. Many homes were destroyed and while Filipinos have the motivation to rebuild again, they often lack the tools and resources to do so.

Half-Solid, Half-Shadow: Moto Waganari 3D Prints Wireframe Sculptures

“I wanted to create something that never existed before. Something that will amaze us because it is not feasible by human hands,” says German artist Moto Waganari. From the realm of 3D printing a new genre of art is emerging, and Waganari’s work is a prime example. Creating wireframe-like sculptures of humans and animals, his final piece is both solid and intangible – designed to interact with light and create a partnering shadow.

Video Sculptures That Jump Into Real Life

For many years, MARCK was a “handyman” in Switzerland. Those are skills which have served him well in his later career as an artist, creating looping 3D video sculptures that blend multiple layers of reality and fiction. It’s almost impossible to look away.

MAD Campus: An Interactive and Eclectic Art Exhibit at the University of Washington

The University of Washington in Seattle is playing host to a series of interactive art installations this month, called “Mad Campus.” The event is sponsored by local art organization Mad Art, who makes it their mission to promote art to the public through innovative and surprising installations while supporting local and emerging artists.

Interview with Burning Man Artist Kirsten Berg

Kirsten Berg (featured previously) is one of the most well known yogis in the Ashtanga world, with people flying all over the globe to attend her classes in Thailand, Bali and the States, yet for 3 months of the year, she commits her time and energy to gifting amazing art installations at Burning Man. This year, her installation called (In)Visible was supported by the Burning Man organization and had a prominent location next to the Temple of Grace. The sculpture was a 20ft high column of faceted cubes that contained iridescent windows to reflect a variety of colors throughout the day and night.

We had the opportunity to talk with Kirsten Berg regarding her inspiration, lifestyle and future plans for her art.

Norman Rockwell’s “Connoisseur” Admires the GIF Masterpieces of Today

For the GIF connoisseur, there isn’t a huge selection at your local gallery or museum. But one art space has emerged digitally, bringing those with a taste for looping images that same sense of admiring a masterpiece… in the company of one particular fellow. He originally appeared in Norman Rockwell’s painting The Connoisseur in 1951. It showed him observing what looked like a Jackson Pollock piece.

Exclusive Interview with Israeli Photographer Sharon Avraham

Sharon Avraham is one of the most dynamic emerging photographers in Israel today. A co-founder of Midburn, the Burning Man regional event in Israel, his love for art and community have run deep for some time. Based in beautiful Ein Vered, a little north of Tel Aviv, he runs an artistic intentional community called “David Ranch.” The ranch supports artists from around the world who come to grow their craft surrounded by gardens and horses. This year it served as the building space for many of the large art installations at Burning Man Israel (Midburn).

Sharon recently released a photographic series titled “Color in Motion” and we had the privilege to interview him about his passion for the craft, and where he finds inspiration.

Hand Colored Photographs of Japan in the 1880s

In today’s world we can access photos instantly from almost every part of the planet, but almost 130 years ago, photos weren’t nearly as commonplace. It’s no surprise then, that images that were seen from other locations around the world shaped global perceptions and even identity. One such example was the collection of Italian photographer Adolfo Farsari and his series on the fascinating nation of Japan.

Liter of Light: Bringing Sustainable Light to Developing Communities

Back in 2011, we covered the organization Liter of Light and their mission to bring sustainable light to the Philippines by using plastic bottles. Now, three years later, it is amazing to see what has been accomplished and where the organization is going next.

While originally launched with a grant from the MyShelter foundation, the main proponent behind the movement has been social entrepreneur Illac Diaz. His approach is simple: instead of importing solar products to bring light, he develops the lights locally so that repairs and replacements become simple.