Sean Kenney Builds LEGO Sculptures Inspired by the Natural World

Sean Kenney has been using LEGOs for over a decade to make contemporary sculpture, and in the process he’s worked with millions of the tiny plastic bricks. His most recent work is featuring in his traveling exhibition Nature Connects, which includes 27 sculptures inspired by the web of life – from a small squirrel running along a fence, to a near-life sized bison that used 45,143 LEGO pieces and took 700 hours to complete.

Simple Paper Cylinders Form a Beautiful Sky-Gazing Experience

Sometimes the simplest of materials can create something of impressive beauty. For her graduating thesis project, Japanese art student Shoko Konishi created a structure made completely out of thick pieces of paper. From the outside it looks just fine, but climbing through the tiny door people are treated to an unusually spectacular view of the sky.

Dreams You Can Almost Touch. Paintings by Finnish Artist Samuli Heimonen

Finnish artist Samuli Heimonen creates surreal paintings which explore humanity’s big questions, using metaphor, and his love for animals and nature as a way to tell the story. His dreamlike imagery is highly atmospheric, yet is still able to communicate deep human emotions with near physical impact. Like any dream, the line between reality and illusion is remarkably thin.

Rob Draper Will Draw Beautiful Lettering on Anything, Even Food

Why yes, that is an Ikea hotdog with beautiful typography all over it. Designer and illustrator Rob Draper is the kind of guy who’s unafraid to push the boundaries a bit, even if it ‘knackers’ the nibs of his pens in the process. With plenty of shout-outs to ‘create more’ his meticulous work finds its way onto food items like loaves of sliced bread or the bottom of a bagel. Other pieces are on old discarded Costa coffee cups or the wrapper from eats at Wagamama (both giveaways of his UK-based location).

It’s Not Photoshop. These are Iconic Photographs Recreated as Miniature Models

When they aren’t creating high quality advertising photographs, Switzerland-based Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger have been building impeccably detailed models of iconic photographs. Viewed from the same angle as the original photograph, you would almost swear these were Photoshopped. Like so many good (and crazy) ideas, this one began with a bit of fun

Can You Identify These Movie Posters With Only The Background Showing?

Like a challenge? You know these movies, but do you know the movie poster when the characters and title are removed? That’s what French designer Madani Bendjellal did in his series of retouched images, which leaves only the background of iconic movie posters to identify them. Some you’ll have no problem identifying, others might leave you scratching your head.

Hypnotic Geometry: Kinetic Sculptures by Jennifer Townley

Jennifer Townley’s sculptures would look impressive even if they were sitting still – but, each one moves. Her kinetic sculptures are driven by simple electric motors, and through a series of belts, cogs and shafts, they move in ways which are hypnotically complex.

What’s the Most Popular Girl’s Name? This Video Tracks Their Evolution from 1880 to 2013

From Anna, to Jennifer and Isabella, the popularity of different girl names is always in flux. But what’s in a name? As this bubble chart animation illustrates, there’s a lot of cultural significance to how we name our girls. It tracks the changing favor of different names in America from all the way back in 1880 up to 2013. And while one name may hold the top position for a decade or two, parents are always swaying between following tradition and choosing something different or modern – eventually even the most popular names fall from the spotlight.

Wrap Yourself in Nature: Virginia Lee’s Enchanting Illustrations

English artist Virginia Lee imagines a world filled with the surreal and fantastical. Her illustrations often feature magical landscapes so welcoming the inhabitants can wrap the earth around themselves like a warm blanket. If you’ve ever been enchanted by the quiet woods on a long walk, you know how the world can envelop you in this way.

The “Analog Memory Desk” Uses 1 Kilometer of Paper to Record Your Thoughts & Doodles

Some people think out loud, others have to write it down. The “Analog Memory Desk” is the brainchild of designer Kristin Camara. Her novel desk uses a huge 1000 meter long roll of paper “to record all the small items you write down once, but intend to forget tomorrow.” Just turn the two cranks at the bottom and you have a fresh space for brainstorming, writing notes or doodling to your heart’s content.