A Man is Illustrating All 100k Items in His Late Grandfather’s Tool Shed

Artist Lee John Phillips is in the midst of an impressive undertaking. The resident of Narberth (Arberth), Wales is illustrating every single object in his late grandfather’s toolshed. That amounts to over 100,000 items—every nut, bolt, washer and old hammer. Phillips estimates the project will take about 5 years.

What Are They Cooking? There’s a Breaking Bad Coffee Shop in Turkey

It’s one thing to have a favorite TV series. It’s another to open a business that looks like it. Deniz Kosan loved Breaking Bad so much, he opened ‘Walter’s Coffee Roastery’ in Istanbul, Turkey. Let’s see what he’s cooking up.

8 Tasty Examples of Perfect Cooking Graphics

Whether you use a recipe, or just throw it all together, cooking is a skill obtained over years of practiced effort. It’s not always easy going (…like that time you surprised guests with that risky new souffle) but with the right instructions it will almost always turn out delicious. One of the best tools for learning new cooking techniques or following recipes is a good graphic.

Reinventing a Classic: Converse Just Unveiled Its First All-Star Redesign Since the 1930s

When it comes to shoe fashion, it doesn’t get more iconic than the Chuck Taylor All Star. Now, for the first time since the 1930s, Converse has redesigned its ubiquitous canvas basketball shoe, bringing it a touch of today’s footwear technology while hoping to continue its celebrated place in popular arts and music culture. The new shoe, available in high top or low top, is called the Chuck Taylor All Star II.

This Artist Rented Two Digital Billboards, Then Made Them Look Like They Weren’t There

Over the past month two digital billboards along Massachusetts’ interstate freeways have been blending into their surroundings. During the day, the large electronic screens show images of the lush woodland forest that surrounds them. By night, they light up with high definition images of the moon and magnificent starscapes. If it wasn’t for the recognizable rectangular billboard frame, you could almost miss them.

4 Reasons Vertical Video is Suddenly OK

Despite our title for this post, most people would agree: vertical video is the bane of the smart phone era. Our eyes aren’t stacked on top of each other, making a portrait shaped image less than natural viewing. They don’t fit on standard TV or laptop screens, leaving huge black bars at the border. Heck, Google’s Android camera app even scolds you for trying to go vertical. And we can’t forget about the scourge of “vertical video syndrome”

Is it Time for a Wooden Skyscraper Revolution? It Makes a Lot of Sense.

The world’s population is becoming more urbanized by the day. That means a lot of new city dwellers need somewhere to call home. But, where do we house them? Traditionally it’s been in new concrete or steel buildings and skyscrapers. But there is another option: wood.

Elias Poland Drew Everything He Bought for a Year

Elias Poland spent his 22nd year recording life in a journal, but unlike most people, he didn’t stick to written accounts of the day, love interests or introspection on the meaning of life (although there’s some of that). Feeling he hadn’t been drawing enough, Elias hit on an idea that would encourage creative output: he’d draw a picture of everything he bought for the whole year.

“From coffee to scabies medication, I drew everything.”

This Interactive Music Video Gives You the Golden Touch

Sometimes it’s the simplest ideas that we love the most. Masashi Kawamura of creative lab PARTY (featured previously) teamed up with Logan director Kenji Yamashita to create a music video with a touch screen experience that’s charmingly retro… and by that, we mean touching the screen doesn’t do anything at all

Home in on 4 Centuries of American House Architecture

America has had a long and storied history when it comes to where we call “home”. From the European inspired architecture of the 17th century, to 19th century Craftsman homes, or the “McMansions” of the ‘90s the continual evolution of American house design speaks to our roots and our vision for the future. Pop Chart Lab recently released a print on this theme, The Architecture of American Houses, which sorts over 4 centuries of architecture into 7 major categories (from Colonial to Neo-Eclectic), and 40 subdivisions. It’s fantastically rich on details.