Here Is How 5 Designers Decided To Celebrate A Fantastic Writer

Roald Dahl is known for his hypnotizing novels that anybody who has ever read them, will remember for the rest of their lives. Over his lifetime, Dahl wrote 48 books of literature and poetry, twelve of which were turned into film adaptations. His works have inspired and influenced the creative industry, from Quentin Blake’s illustrations to Tim Burton’s directorial interpretations.

If he was still alive, Roald Dahl would’ve recently celebrated his 100th birthday. To celebrate and honor the man that has inspired and touched the lives of so many, It’s Nice That brought together a group of creatives to illustrate their preferred Gobblefunk word.

Roald Dahl Design

Peter Judson: Trogglehumper

Designer Peter Judson chose Trogglehumper, a term Dahl created to define “an absolutely frightful dream.” The term was originally created in The BFG to illustrate the discovers Sophie and the giant made while delivering dreams into children’s bedrooms.

“I always loved the dark and ugly undertones in his stories. They always felt like Trogglehumpers…” Judson explains. “I wanted to give the type a mechanical yet fluid flow going from brighter happier colours that move into an awkward darkness playing with the unpredictability of dreams and nightmares.”

Mariano Pascual: Lixivate

Mariano Pascual: Lixivate

Mariano Pascual, a graphic designer and illustrator, decided to create a curvy, “jumbly” typeface to portray the word “lixivate,” the process of “being turned into liquid and being squashed at the same time.” The word was first described by Grandma Georgina in Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator to describe her cautiousness of Wonka and his gadgets.

The design brings to mind the many delights Wonka created in his factory and the runny letters make the word look like one of Wonka’s gloopy everlasting gobstoppers.

12—B: Human Bean

12—B: Human Bean

Graphic design and print studio 12—B also settled on a word from Dahl’s The BFG: “human beans.” The phrase was uttered by the friendly giant, the only non-child-eating giant . The giant refers to human beings as “human beans,” which is a perfect illustration of Dahl’s dark sense of humor.

The rather than creating a typeface for the word, the studio took a quote from the text and replaced “human beans” with patterns that highlight the whimsical aspects of Dahl’s narration. “With fond memories reading and chuckling away to the BFG calling us ‘human beans,’ it only felt right to choose this phrase. Let us not forget that most Giants will happily eat us, right or left?”

Benedikt Luft: Time-Twiddler

Benedikt Luft: Time-Twiddler

Benedikt Luft, a graphic designer and illustrator, decided to illustrate time-twiddler, which is used to describe “something that is immortal.” The term can also be found in The BFG and is used to express the immortality of giants: “‘Giants is never dying,’ the BFG answered. ‘Sometimes and quite suddenly, a giant is disappearing and nobody is never knowing where he goes to. But mostly us giants is simply going on and on like whiffsy time-twiddlers.’”

Luft illustrates his interpretation of the word by depicting an apple intercepted with worm, which is a representation of a life-cycle but with a humorous undertone similar to Dahl’s literature.

Our Place: Muggled

Our Place: Muggled

Graphic design studio Our Place chose “muggled,” the feeling of “being confused” or “a mess or a muddle,” which can be found in the Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary. The muggled feeling is elicited in the patterned design, which makes it difficult to tell where the start or finish point is.

[Via: It’s Nice That]

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