These Photographers Build Site-Specific Pinhole Cameras for Each Image

We’ve written about building cameras out of cardboard, concrete, and even eggs, but photographers David Janesko and Adam Donnelly are making them with sand, logs and other objects found right where they take their pictures. The duo’s series of landscape photos is strikingly low tech, with each print involving the construction of a site specific pinhole camera made from the materials right at that location. Even the aperture of the camera is found on location–anything like a leaf or shell with a tiny round hole will do.

In this way the physical components of the landscape, feedback into the character of the camera and the final photograph,” Donnelly writes. “The cameras are also large enough for one of us to fit into. We act as the mechanical parts of the camera, like the shutter and film advance.

That’s right, the photographers climb inside their cave-like camera, then manually open and close the lens—often with the use of a hat to block the light. It doesn’t get simpler than this.

Find out more about the ongoing project called Site Specific Cameras on Adam Donnelly’s personal site.

Tunitas Beach Camera

Tunitas Beach Camera

Tunitas Beach Photo

Tunitas Beach Photo

Here’s how the two photographers created their Tunitas Beach camera:

Gazos Creek Camera

Gazos Creek Camera

Gazos Creek photo

Gazos Creek photo

San Luis Reservior camera

San Luis Reservior camera

San Luis Reservior photo

San Luis Reservior photo

Pescadero Creek camera

Pescadero Creek camera

Pescadero Creek photo

Pescadero Creek photo

Kebet Ridge camera

Kebet Ridge camera

Kebet Ridge pinhole lens

Kebet Ridge pinhole lens

Kebet Ridge photo

Kebet Ridge photo

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