Simon Stålenhag Paints a Fantastic Yet Familiar Future of Machines in Nature

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The odd thing about the future is, once it arrives it never seems so futuristic. I mean, how many times have you heard, “Wow, I can’t believe it’s already 2013…”? But look around and it all seems pretty normal. That’s the feeling I get when looking at these seriously impressive paintings by Swedish artist Simon Stålenhag. His paintings show a universe much like our own, but beside the everyday humans carrying out everyday activities are massive buildings and machines running on technologies currently unknown.

It’s this sense of normal-ness that make Stålenhag’s paintings so interesting. Nobody in the images appears impressed at all with the wild machinery that surrounds them. A hovering tractor is nothing new here, just another tool to get the job of harvesting done. The worn, and even broken down state of these implements of society is just further evidence of their un-remarkable nature.

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And speaking of nature: much of Stålenhag’s work is dominated by near utopian vistas being enjoyed and explored. The towering buildings and machines here are just an afterthought, forgotten in open fields of grass to rust and decay as nature carries on.

How long in the future will we be seeing these “futuristic” changes? With real-life technologies like Honda’s impressive ASIMO and movies like Robot & Frank showing us that it’s normal to have impressive technology surrounding us, we’re already getting accustomed to the future.

The very productive Simon Stålenhag hasn’t been content to simply make beautiful artwork, he’s also created a rather cool 16-bit game as one half of Pixeltruss. It’s called Ripple Dot Zero and you can play it online here. You can see more of his seriously cool paintings at simonstalenhag.se, or purchase very affordable prints at Red Bubble.

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via The Coolector

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