Data + Design Project

Layered Portraits From the Fourth Dimension

Wednesday 03.28.2012 , Posted by
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It’s not often that we see collages which take us through four dimensions with a quick glance, leaving us not with just depth, but also with the passage of time. These complex and beautiful portraits from Brazilian artist Lucas Simões, explore the often forgotten aspect of time, taking multiple images of the same person and layering them into both organic and geometric sunken relief.

If there was a dimension for meaning, Simões has captured that too in his beautiful works. For his predominantly organically styled series desretratos, Simões invited intimate friends to tell a secret as he took their portrait. Not intending to hear the secret, he also had them select a song for him to listen to as he captured their facial expressions. After the session, he asked if their secret had a color: information he used in selecting the final hue of each portrait. His second series desmemórias — which is more geometric in form — follows a similar theme, only this time his subjects are new acquaintances and friends he no longer keeps in contact with. The photographs where made during a conversation and for the most part have not had their colors changed.

Simões creation process is both highly precise and complex. The photograph displayed at the bottom of this post captures his steps well, demonstrating the near laser-cutter precision he attains with just a sharp knife. You can find more of his exceptional work, including another 4th dimensional work quasi-cinema, at lucassimoes.com.br.

See Also The Beauty of Flooded Architecture

Below: Works from Desmemórias, a series of ten portraits taken during conversations with new acquaintances and childhood friends Simões no longer maintains contact with.

paranoias.org

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Benjamin Starr

Written by Benjamin Starr



Known in some circles as the most amazing man in the universe, he once saved an entire family of muskrats from a sinking, fire engulfed steamboat while recovering from two broken arms relating to a botched no-chute wingsuit landing in North Korea. When not impressing people with his humbling humility, he can be found freelance writing, finding shiny objects on the internet, enjoying the company of much-appreciated friends and living out his nomadic nature. He is Managing Editor of Visual News. Follow his movements on Twitter:

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Comments

  1. Very intersting, thanks.

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