Data + Design Project

The “LowLine”– New York’s Proposed Underground Park

Sunday 02.26.2012 , Posted by
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How do you transform a 60-yr old underground Trolley Terminal into an underground park complete with growing vegetation?
Dan Barasch and James Ramsey want to use fiber optic cables to reflect surface sunlight underground. The result will be a first ever of its kind park lying under Delancey street, in Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

The Delancey Underground, dubbed “The LowLine” after New York’s successful High Line park, recently launched a Kickstarter campaign. As they put it, “we need to build a full-scale installation—a “mini LowLine”—so people can see this with their own eyes…This tech demo will be an invaluable tool in helping convince our community, potential funders, the City, and the MTA that this idea can work. It will also help us refine the technology so we get it perfect once it’s time to build the real thing.”

The creators claim that “the “LowLine” is essentially part of the next phase in urban design, in which human scale and increasing resource scarcity force us to imagine smarter, more creative use of public spaces.” By using innovative fiber optics to reflect light underground, this will save electricity and reduce carbon emissions, generating the capacity for plants, trees, and grasses to thrive indoors.

The space in its current form:

The Vision:

The technology:

The location:

Dan and James Explain:

Via: Kickstarter

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Shane Keaney

Written by Shane Keaney



I’m a small town kid from New England turned New Yorker.
A graphic designer who lives and breaths music,
comedy, riding my bike, and yes, design. I also tend
to bust out some Cantonese when I've had a little to
drink.

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Comments

  1. How about restoring our cities and feeding the poor?

  2. Since it doesn’t rain and pretty covered from the elements, seems like a good new place for bums to make their home.

  3. @Mark: i don’t see how this is *not* restoring our city. It’s a much needed improvement over what’s there, and local businesses–ravaged by Robert Moses’s initiatives in the ’30s–support the project. There are also lots of great nonprofits in CB3 which are feeding the poor. Father’s Heart, Graffiti, Bowery Mission, others.

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