Data + Design Project

The Surreal & Iconic Portraits of Philippe Halsman

Thursday 12.30.2010 , Posted by
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Before the age of Photoshop, there was Philippe Halsman. His dynamic and imaginative photography broke the rules of the day by going against the soft focus style of the time and giving sharp focus to his subjects. He used both stage and darkroom techniques to produce gravity defying objects and invented new ways of interacting with subjects. His works often appeared on the cover of Life Magazine. He worked with celebrities as varied as Salvador Dali, Richard Nixon, and The Duke and Dutchess of Wales.

Wikipedia on Philippe Halsman and his illustrious and creative life:
Philippe Halsman (2 May 1906 – 25 June 1979) was a Latvian-born American portrait photographer. Born to a Jewish family of Morduch (Max) Halsman, a dentist, and Ita Grintuch, a grammar school principal, in Riga, Halsman studied electrical engineering in Dresden.

“In September 1928, Halsman went on a hiking tour in the Austrian Alps with his father, Morduch. During this tour, Morduch died from severe head injuries. The circumstances were never completely clarified and Halsman was sentenced to four years’ imprisonment for patricide. The case provoked anti-Jewish propaganda and thus gained international publicity, and Albert Einstein and Thomas Mann wrote in support of Halsman. Halsman was released in 1931, under the condition that he leave Austria for good, never to return.” Source

“Halsman consequently left Austria for France. He began contributing to fashion magazines such as Vogue and soon gained a reputation as one of the best portrait photographers in France, renowned for his sharp, dark images that shunned the old soft focus look. When France was invaded, Halsman fled to Marseille and he eventually managed to obtain a U.S. visa, aided by family friend Albert Einstein.” Source

“Halsman had his first success in America when the cosmetics firm Elizabeth Arden used his image of model Constance Ford against the American flag in an advertising campaign for “Victory Red” lipstick. A year later in 1942 he found work with Life, photographing hat designs, one of which, a portrait of a model in a Lilly Daché hat, was his first of the many covers he would do for Life.” Source

“In 1941 Halsman met the surrealist artist Salvador Dalí and they began to collaborate in the late 1940s. The 1948 work Dali Atomicus explores the idea of suspension, depicting three cats flying, a bucket of thrown water, and Salvador Dalí in mid air. The title of the photograph is a reference to Dalí’s work Leda Atomica which can be seen in the right of the photograph behind the two cats. Halsman reported that it took 28 attempts to be satisfied with the result. Halsman and Dali eventually released a compendium of their collaborations in the 1954 book Dali’s Mustache, which features 36 different views of the artist’s distinctive mustache. Another famous collaboration between the two was In Voluptas Mors, a surrealistic portrait of Dali beside a large skull, in fact a tableau vivant composed of seven nudes. Halsman took three hours to arrange the models according to a sketch by Dali. A version of In Voluptas Mors was used subtly in the poster for the film The Silence of The Lambs, and recreated in a poster for the film The Descent.” Source

“In 1947, he made what was to become one of his most famous photos of a mournful Albert Einstein, who during the photography session recounted his regrets about his role in the United States pursuing the atomic bomb. The photo would later be used in 1966 on a U.S. postage stamp and in 1999, on the cover of Time, when Time dubbed Einstein as ‘Person of the Century.’” Source

“In 1951 Halsman was commissioned by NBC to photograph various popular comedians of the time including Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Groucho Marx, and Bob Hope. While photographing the comedians doing their acts, he captured many of the comedians in mid air, which went on to inspire many later jump pictures of celebrities including the Ford family, The Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Marilyn Monroe, Maria Felix and Richard Nixon.” Source

“Halsman commented, “When you ask a person to jump, his attention is mostly directed toward the act of jumping and the mask falls so that the real person appears.”The photographer developed a philosophy of jump photography, which he called jumpology. He published Philippe Halsman’s Jump Book in 1959, which contained a tongue-in-cheek discussion of jumpology and 178 photographs of celebrity jumpers” Source


Below: The rare, original image from Dali Atomicus shows the photograph before heavy darkroom modification. In it you can see the wet floor from previous etempts, wires holding up objects, an assistant holding the chair and an empty picture frame before it was carefully added.

Wikipedia text licensed under Creative Commons: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
Images in the public domain: http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm

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Paul Caridad

Written by Paul Caridad



Bicycled the perimeter of USA, hitch hiked across the States dressed as monk. Nomadic for the next few years. Would love to connect, so check out my links below! email: Paul@VisualNews.com

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Comments

  1. Excellent work! Awesome pics and nice writing. Smooth way of readin’ your post. Muy Recomendable! I’ll share this with my friends!

  2. great post! These are some amazing photos… I especially like the last one you included showing how they actually made that happen.

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